The Berenst#in Bears Problem: Are We Living In An Alternate Worldline?

By on January 21, 2015 // Parallel Universes // 323 Comments

The Berenstein Bears Problem
Image: ESO via CC by 2.0

A couple months ago, someone left an innocuous comment on my post 4 Weird “Clues” that Parallel Universes Exist. The comment was this:

“You need to look up the Berenst#in Bears problem.”

My response at first was probably what yours is now: The what? But after a quick Google search, I realized what this person was talking about. The Berenstein Bears.

Now, if you don’t know about The Berenstein Bears, they were a series of children’s books, and eventually a cartoon, created by Stan and Jan Berenstein. They focused on a family of bears, and did the usual educational children’s book/tv series thing. Simple enough. I remember them, vaguely, and I believe I owned a book or two when I was a kid. It’s been a while.

So what’s the problem?

They’re not The Berenstein Bears. They’ve never been The Berenstein Bears. Despite the fact that many others remember them as The Berenstein Bears, and I myself still pronounce their name as The Berenstein Bears, this is false. This is wrong.

They are The Berenstain Bears.

The Strangest Thing

It was such a strange feeling to find that out. To see Google correcting my spelling, to see the Wikipedia entry titled The Berenstain Bears, to see book covers that seemed at odds with the memories I had in my head. What was going on?

The “problem,” as it were, became clearer when I found this post by someone named Reece (“a graduate student of physics”) at a blog titled the Wood between Worlds (an interesting place, check it out).

Reece’s post is a trip down the rabbit hole for anyone, like myself, who remembers that cartoon family as The Berenstein Bears, not The Berenstain Bears. And with it comes a strange hypothesis.

Did something in our universe change to make this happen? “Somehow, at some time in the last 10 years or so, reality has been tampered with and history has been retroactively changed,” Reece explains, “The bears really were called the ‘BerenstEin Bears’ when we were growing up, but now reality has been altered such that the name of the bears has been changed post hoc.”

Reece’s proposal is essentially that somewhere along the way we shifted into an almost indistinguishable parallel universe. Almost, as there are minor differences, many we probably haven’t realized yet.

“…we moved to the stAin hexadectant, while our counterparts moved to our hexadectant (stEin). They are standing around expressing their confusion about the ‘Berenstein Bears’ and how they all remember “Berenstain Bears” on the covers growing up.”

In a later post, Reece would tackle some of the flaws in the idea. Many people do remember them as The Berenstain Bears, including members of the Berenstain family, of course. But perhaps these individuals are simply native to this Berenstain universe, and notice no difference. Others (perhaps yourself included) don’t remember one way or the other.

Perhaps we all just read it and heard it incorrectly.

Of Bears and Time Travel

Another possibility, however, is that what we’re dealing with isn’t a matter of parallel universes naturally diverging, but rather a meddling time traveler interfering with the past. In fact, at least one individual has made the connection between this curious problem and John Titor, musing that Titor’s travels in our worldline caused a divergence that not only prevented the Y2K Bug, but also changed the spelling of Berenstein Bears.

“…To me, this BerenstEin (which it WAS, and was supposed to have remained) Phenomenon is an Echo of Proof that OUR World-line was Affected by the Time/Dimensional Traveler, John Titor. Maybe he wasn’t in Our Specific World-line in 1975, but whatever he did There (or Then) caused Ours to be Created as a Branch-off from that point.”

Could our false memories, in fact, be alter-vús?

Well, myself, I’m willing to admit that I probably read the name wrong. It’s just one of those things that happens, and as always I ride that line between skepticism and belief.

Or maybe I didn’t, and one of the above theories is true.

Either way, it’s an intriguing outcome of events when so many people remember something a certain way, only to find out that the reality is entirely different. Check the links I shared above, dive down the rabbit hole yourself. There are apparently other inconsistencies. What do you remember?

Which universe is yours?

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About the Author

Rob Schwarz is a writer, blogger, and part-time peddler of mysterious tales. He manages Stranger Dimensions in between changing aquarium filters and reading bad novels about mermaids.
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  • luke

    wow that is the my favorite post i’ve read on here. thank you

    • Rob

      Very cool! Did you remember it one way or another?

  • TonyG

    While I share a similar level of both interest and skepticism, this one is kind of mind blowing. I still watch this cartoon now (I have small kids), and I’m not sure how I would have spelled it if asked. Probably with an E. Yes, it’s most likely just an easy mistake to make based on other words with similar structures, but maybe…

    • Rob

      Oh, definitely. My main point with that “skepticism and belief” bit is that, even with a perfectly rational explanation available, it’s still extremely weird!

  • Heath

    If it was simply a matter of time travel we would not have any recollection of an alternate spelling, correct? Because the timeline, once changed, would have corrected any chance of alternate memory. At least, I assume.
    Interesting article. I have never heard of this theory but I remember their name with an EI not an A, I had found myself in a bewildered state when I first realized this a few years ago.

    • Rob

      Yeah. There are so many different ideas about how time travel would work.

      The deal with the John Titor alter-vu thing, at least, is that “time travel” is really “worldline travel,” so we could be experiencing memories from ourselves in a parallel universe that was created by the act of time travel. Or something like that.

      Weird stuff.

    • Alan Wescoat

      What is rotten about it from my perspective is that whatever happens to memory when timestreams merge, diverge, or get retconned is not the same for everyone. I am stuck with a whole lot of entirely CLEAR memories of versions of the past which are no longer true in this timestream. You want to think that alterations of the past will conveniently alter everyone’s memories of what was changed. It works that way for some. it may work that way for most most of the time, but it does not work that way for me in particular a lot of the times when the past has been altered, and it is quite irritating, to say the least. In this case, I am reassured that someone finally managed to change a small detail with which enough people were familiar that a WHOLE LOT OF PEOPLE finally noticed that the past occasionally changes.

    • Robert Allen

      So maybe all those Holocaust deniers have alter-vus of a timeline in which it was averted, whereas in ours it either persisted or that horror was put BACK into motion.

    • Alan Wescoat

      That is a really interesting correlation. With Holocaust denial, there are some interesting problems. The first body count was 9,000,000. Then it fell to 6,000,000, and the body count has continued to drop ever since. There are also problems in that the attempts to verify that certain chambers were used for gassing prisoners with Zyklon B have resulted in a complete absence of evidence that said chambers were ever used in such a way and seem to indicate that they COULD NOT HAVE been used for such a purpose.

      World War II (The Sequel!) may itself have resulted from a fracture of the space-time continuum, and, as the continuum has been healing, various details have only roughly fit together. Hence, just as many careful readers such as myself CLEARLY remember “Berenstein” and NOT “Berenstain”, many may find themselves remembering the Holocaust in a world where physical details of what happened in that possible past did not continue into this possible present.

      Since about 2011, I have been strongly convinced that the present we are collectively experiencing is the result of a hodge-podge amalgamation of various formerly possible pasts. It explains a lot. I do know that in 2001-2002 when I attempted to re-watch Holocaust material I had first seen in the 1980s, I was met with different imagery, some of which was obviously faked in a way which had not been faked when I first saw it.

    • Alan Wescoat

      In the late 1990s, I was listening to an NPR report about a survey in which 99% of Americans expressed that they believed that the Holocaust happened. I had alarm bells go off in my head. The first alarm was “What does the other 1% believe?” The second and even louder alarm said “WHY DID THEY EVEN ASK SUCH A QUESTION?” What was the motivation for polling people to see whether or not they believed in the Holocaust? Since then, there has been gradual creep of holocaust denial. The fact that Holocaust denial is prosecutable in some places which are supposedly democratic republics is clear indication to me that something really strange is going on.

    • Spike

      Memory is terrible. Humans are subject to all kinds of biases, misconceptions, misinterpretations, hallucinations, and outright lies. Everything from the smell of the room you’re in to the texture of your underpants affects how you recall memories and how they are likely to be distorted. These shortcomings are why we have science. People are not to be trusted. Eye witness testimony is notoriously unreliable. That’s why we rely on actual evidence. And so far, all that evidence seems to indicate both that time travel is impossible, and that it has not yet ever occurred with any detectable effects.

    • Jordan P

      Thanks Spike, there is a true voice of reason on here.

    • Alan Wescoat

      Memory is more stable than generally assumed. Reality shifts often interfere with memory. People tend to side with the physical evidence, even when the memory is sure that reality has changed. We need to be careful not to offhandedly dismiss genuine evidence. The Berenst#in Bears Effect is detectable in that vast numbers of people are CERTAIN that reality has changed. You cannot dismiss memory and perception because those are the means by which we actually interact with reality.

    • Spike

      Why do we need to trust our senses just because we have them? The fact we can be fooled by magicians and optical illusions is proof our senses are far from ironclad. We deal with perceptions, not with absolutes.

    • Elycia T

      The study of memory is fascinating. It explains the differences in the way people see the world. Our perspectives and beliefs have a lot to do with what we experience and how we remember it. When it comes to memory, there really is no fact. It seems that everyone’s recollection is always just a little different than someone else’s when it comes to recalling the same event. On top of that, we seem to remember what fits best with our current beliefs. Memory is definitely unreliable.

    • Demosthenes Smith

      While the “false memory” or “mistaken recollection” ideas are the most logical explanations for this amusing- but insanely interesting- article, the cool thing is that we cannot totally discount the alternate dimension/alternate timeline hypothesis.

      Actual science tells us that multiple universes exist, and if this is “true”, then the sky’s the limit, as they say.

      What’s more frightening- that we all exist in a changed or alternate reality where they really were the “Beren-stEEN Bears”- or that we are all existing as extremely advanced Artificial Intelligence in a virtual simulation?

    • guy

      “Actual science tells us that multiple universes exist”

      No it doesn’t. Certain QM interpretations imply “many worlds,” but the vast majority of theorists reject them. See: Copenhagen interpretation

      The rest of Multiverse Mania is a product of string theory, which is utterly beyond empiricism, and has much more to do with the vastness of space and the “1000 monkeys at 1000 typewriters” principle than anything to do with time travel or alternate universes.

      This does sound like something Michio Kaku would say, though.

    • Spikey Love

      So Dr. Michio, lol!!!

    • Jodie Squibb

      i dont believe that if science found time trave to be possible that it would ever be released knowledge to the public. In fact, if I were a leader of a world or country and new time travel was an actuality, i would make CERTAIN that NO ONE knew this. if people were allowed to time travel, someone might travel in time and keep me from being elected. Other than that, even if you werent a ruler of some kind, even if you were just some science guy in a basement somewhere….i would really hope you wouldn’t reveal time travel to the world. No one needs to know how to alter time. It would cause devastation.

    • Spike

      Science is as democratic as we could possibly make anything. There is no alliance of scientists keeping information away from the public. Scientists are the public. You probably know at least one. Leaders of most countries do not have the power to keep scientists from publishing findings. And science is something anyone can do. You do not need to already be a scientist, engaging in scientific study can make you a scientist too!

    • Ima Pseudonym

      Perhaps what we’re witnessing is the temporal wreckage of multiple, abortive attempts by time travelers to either kill Hitler, or interfere to ensure the Third Reich triumphs, or both.

      If time travel is ever discovered by humans or posthumans, assassinating the linchpin of arguably the bloodiest period in human history is probably the killer app for it. The period from the 1920s to 1945 is probably one gigantic temporal snarl.

    • Steven McDougall

      I’m sorry, but you need to seek professional help if these dilusions really effect your life. I am being entirely serious with you right now ok. The reason most of us remember stein and not stain is because, most of us probably liked the TV show better than the books and because the theme song right at the beginning sounds exactly like stein because of the singers accent and because kids all have short attention spans we all engraved that first part of the song in our heads and personally thought stein. Unlike the few intellectual geniouses , who obviously read the books more or didn’t even have a TV or watch the show, learnt their name the right way. I am sadly not one of those view but the reason I know this is because I remember as a child asking my parents why they said stain and not stein and they scolded me for not saying it right and fighting with them about it because “the tv said so” as I so elequintly put it as a child. This is 100% with certainty your reason

    • Alan Wescoat

      Wow! Did spellings and English grammar change again? I remember ‘delusions’ rather than ‘dilusions’ and ‘affect’ rather than ‘effect’ being proper for the sentence above.

      If you believe that it is a single alteration of the past which has led to my conclusions, then you need to rethink. Actually, the numerous Mandela Effects I have experienced at present have minimal impact on my life.

      You presume that reality is stable. That is fine. It is not correct, but your personal experiences with reality collapses have not led to sufficient memory disparities to lead you to the same conclusion. That is totally okay.

      There is no professional help for dealing with reality collapses. Instead, we have people who decide on the entirely unverifiable (and incorrect) assumption that reality is entirely stable and that there are various inexplicable psychological conditions demanding a lifetime of living as a drugged person for the benefit of massive pharmaceutical industries.

      My memories are not incorrect, and the spelling did not emerge from the TV show. I had already been familiar with the Berenstein Bears for years from seeing other kids reading the books in elementary school (I was already reading novels then). I had a much better attention span than the majority of my peers. I only saw the first two Berenstein Bears TV specials, which came out a year or two before the TV series started, and it was actually pronounce “Beren-stine” with the “-stein” pronounced like the “-stein” in “Frankenstein”

      This is a composite reality. There is nothing wrong with that. Unstable realities have merged, and memories serve to preserve information. This is a good thing. Enjoy your day, and I hope that you get over whatever anxieties you may have with the notion that reality is in flux. It is not much of a problem if you just roll with it.

    • Matti

      Ha-ha, nice try…!

    • jemblue

      “Then it fell to 6,000,000, and the body count has continued to drop ever since.” It has? News to me.

      Incidentally, my understanding is that the 6 million figure is only for Jewish victims, and that the total death count was 11 million.

    • Alan Wescoat

      Wow! 11,000,000 is really high! You can Google “Holocaust denial” to fairly easily find some pages that start piling up disparate “facts”.

    • Karen

      Thanks for ur thought provoking comments Alan wescott! I dont no that i believe in time travel but i think that based on the HUGE change in what the general public seems to recognize as reality (how we all view and interact with the world around us) we could actually have altered the space time continuum and have moved off course into a different dimension.

    • Alan Wescoat

      Well, as the space-time continuum continues to heal from the ruptures of the Time Wars, along with unintentional disruptions caused by time toursim, extremely similar realities are merging. These realities tend to merge all of the time as the continuum heals, but this particular issue of the Berenst#in Bears Problem simply makes it more evident.

    • Amanda braeker

      I am curious as to what you experienced. My reality changed so drastically, quickly and pervasively, that I am completely baffled and unable to draw any conclusions about what happened? The city I live in changed so much and so disturbingly in such a short time I truly wondered whether or not I went to a parallel universe where theres a city that looks like the one I grew up in and lived in my whole life to one that only resembles it in physical appearance. But, all the people changed with the exception of a few and some key people that are in my life. The disturbing thing is that the city I occupy now feels like a bad place where terrible things have occurred and are occuring. The city I lived in that was my hearts home. It was a sweet and magical place. The city I live in now is none of those things. What the hell happened?!

      I think the govt covertly henpcided much of the residents to make available housing for covert military and their familys.

      This city is strategic ground zero for technology. Did the feds take it over or did I transport to a parrallel universe?

      Either way the change was so violent and all encompassing I am suffering PTSD and still have the sense of shock and unknowing. This was two years ago.

      Im in San Francisco.

      Can anyone please assist me who is aware of the changes here? Or if you have any thoughts on the matter.

      Signed,

      Still Spinning

    • Jc Equality Tilton

      There is something strange going on… But like Alan mentioned in the previous post, you have to roll with it. This does not mean you have to accept it as your known reality, but it is your reality for now. I think most are still trying to figure out what is causing the mass awakening millions are experiencing right now. It might have something to do with the pole shift, or it might just be the biggest social experiment the world has ever witnessed. But until there is an answer try to find the positive about your surroundings, reach for familiar comforts, and keep talking about what is happening. Stay safe

    • Jc Equality Tilton

      What is great about this, there is a mass of people awakening all at the same time, so is it possible we could change our future? It is interesting to think this might be possible.

  • Keith

    I swear I remember it with an E. So does my wife. I guess its easy enough if you are used to hearing names that end in Stein to make that mistake in your head and think its Stein instead of Stain.

    • Rob

      Yeah, it seems like an easy mistake. But that feeling when I found out was just “What?!”

    • Keith

      My head still hurts from thinking about it.

    • Alan Wescoat

      The past was altered. You are not mis-remembering.

    • clara27

      But why would anyone deliberately alter something like this? Or if it wasn´t deliberate, what would have had to happen for a change like this to happen? And for what reason, if any?

    • Alan Wescoat

      This might be a deliberate alteration to show a HUGE number of people that the past is being altered. Abuse of time travel has had some nasty effects.

      The Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States USED TO have an explicit and unequivocal prohibition against debtor’s prisons. In this version of reality, that has never been the case. Likewise, the Thirteenth Amendment USED TO unequivocally prohibit slavery. However, the version in place in this version of the present makes clear exception for those convicted of a crime. Now that we live in a reality where anyone can be pulled over for no reason and have drugs planted on them, EVERYONE is subject to possible enslavement, despite past efforts to create a government where such enslavement was not possible.

      Thus, time travel has been abused in order to disempower people in the present. If you were fighting against this, you might latch onto something like Berenstein and switch the customs agent who checked the family in upon immigrating in order to change the E to an A so that, decades or centuries down the line, gigantic numbers of people would start to notice that the past has been altered. They may not believe in time travel or the malleability of the space-time continuum, but at least they will be looking for some kind of answer to the quandary. People are looking for an answer. People who never gave much thought to time travel, possible worlds, or the space-time continuum are dealing with the fact that the past as they clearly remember it fails to correspond with the present and its established history. It is a way to wake people up, to get them to seek answers.

  • Reece

    Hey, thanks for the traffic!

    • Rob

      Hey, thanks for stopping by! I really enjoy your blog.

    • Reece

      Thanks, I took a peek at yours. Looks like we’re doing fairly similar things. Keep it up!

  • GirlParanormal

    This is so strange, are you sure your not playing a practical joke? I grew up watching and reading the bearinsEIN bears, and it was always with an e!

    • Rob

      It’s just so odd that so many people would remember it with an e, myself included. Even if it’s just a mistake, that’s a lot of people making the same mistake.

    • GirlParanormal

      Seriously! I asked everyone in my family, just by showing them a photo. To write the name of the cartoon and they all wrote it with an E. whats going on!?!? haha

    • Lynne Martin

      I’m 37 years old. My brothers are 39 and 41 respectively. We have had the book series since it began and it was always spelled and pronounced Beren*stain*. Perhaps you saw and pronounced it like you thought it was but not how it actually was.

    • Ellis Baehr

      You mean our mind sees what we want it to see??? Come on now Lynne, that makes wayyy less sense than time travel and parallel universes 😉

    • Jenn

      The mind seeing what it wants to see only applies – in this particular case – if a meagre handful of people remembered Berenstein with an E. But it would seem that MOST people remember it with an E, indicating that it’s not the mind seeing what it wants.

    • Ellis Baehr

      The National Institute of Health’s Longitudinal Studies have proven that 17-20% of the US population has dyslexia to some extent. That means millions of Americans are affected on some level. So no, it’s not that ridiculous to assert that millions of people misread something, imprinted it in their mind, and then continued to see it that way from then on. What is ridiculous is to assume that you, or even a group of people, can never be wrong. It’s OK to make a mistake, it happens to everyone all the time, whether you/they want to admit it or not.

    • Jenn

      Nobody is saying it’s not OK to make mistakes. We all make mistakes on a daily basis. It is possible that an unusually high percentage of the population are remembering incorrectly, but in these numbers it’s not probable. I’m in no way saying you’re definitely wrong, but I encourage you to be open to new possibilities. “Almost everyone was just dyslexic in the exact same way in this one particular instance” completely discards the potential for things beyond our current forms of measurement.

      I myself am a highly sceptical person. It’s not easy for me to say “It looks like there could be more to this than meets the eye.”

    • Mick Dundee

      the article creates a self contained confirmation bias false memory

    • Rob

      Ehhhh…looking back, you may very well be right. It’s possible that, because of the way I wrote this post, some people are being “primed” to remember the name as Berenstein before I hit them with Berenstain, if that’s what you’re getting at.

      …and that’s a very interesting point! Unintentional, though.

      Still, a lot of people (like myself) remembered the name incorrectly on our own. Not saying that means anything, or takes away from your point, of course. And to be honest, I find that whole psychological angle just as interesting as the parallel universe one.

    • Mick Dundee

      Hi Rob, I appreciate reading your response. I’m glad you took my point seriously.

      I’m currently checking with friends, coworkers and family to see what they remember. This is mostly out of curiosity and fun.

      I wonder since we know stein is a last name ending if we just remember it that way because it makes the most sense with what we know.

      I’m currently trying to figure out how to ask people what they remember with out accidently suggesting one way to the other. any suggestions? I cant use the # because I’ll be asking people and not typing.

      Perhaps remember that book series about those bears?

      Again it was quite the pleasure having the author of the article respond to my comment.

    • Rob

      The only thing I can suggest is to just show them a picture of the bears (sans title) and give them a short description. Not sure how else I’d go about it, really

      And thank you for reading and commenting! I appreciate it (and that goes for you all, too!).

    • Alan Wescoat

      It seems to me after having read over the posts and having listened to this reality’s version of the song from the show that saying BerenSTEEN without putting much emphasis on the long e sound will be fine. There seems to be strong agreement that while the A spells ‘stain’, that its proper pronunciation is with a long e sound. You could also simply pronounce a schwa in place of any distinct vowel sound. That works.

    • Rachel

      I just asked as if I was trying to spell it and couldn’t remember how. That seemed to work.

    • Alan Wescoat

      I first noticed it several months ago without knowing about it as a part of the Mandela Effect. I live in Korea, and, while books are not often pirated, it does occasionally happened. I was in an English educational book store and noticed “Berenstain”, which I thought was an odd misprint, then speculated that it was a pirated book but also thought the prospect that it was pirated was also odd. Two days ago, I found a link to this article in my Facebook feed with the header of “The Berenst#in Bears Problem”, and I automatically wondered why the final e in “Berenstein” had been replaced with a hatch mark. Hence, if someone sees the article directly, the concern with bias resulting from the writing itself may be an issue. However, nearly ALL of us seem to be accessing the article from neutral links. Those who remember “Berenstain” will automatically register the hatch mark in “Berenst#in” as an a, just as I registered it as an e. Thus, I think the potential for the suggested bias is minor.

      This entire issue is particularly exciting to me because it links me with a large number of people with whom I can discuss phenomena which have been happening to me across my entire life, versions of books and movies coming and going, me witnessing things which almost immediately after did not happen according to other people, etc. I appear to have shifted realities A LOT since early childhood.

    • Rachel

      I thought the same thing so I asked a few different people how to spell it ( over the phone so they didn’t hear each other) and they all said it was with an e. Interestingly enough when I explained to one person why I asked who happens to be super religious and absolutely closed to anything different she immediately changed her story and said she remembered it with an A)

    • carolina giannini

      Mandela Effect at work. People don’t understand the significance
      of this as well as other examples such as the Berenstein Bears, the word
      dilemma with a silent “N” instead of 2 “ms”. I know for a fact that
      these are what I was taught/remember and it’s not like these things were
      changed officially because no matter how far you go back, the changes
      also are retro-active like the timeline was altered as crazy as it
      sounds, it’s the only explanation or we really are living in a simulation
      and the “server” rebooted with some errors.

  • Anne

    I think they just pronounced it weird in the opening. I can’t watch it now but we heard it as stein. And there has been study’s where they show people a picture of themselves doing something, but these photos are fake. Many people claimed they remember being there but in fact thy are false memories.
    Very weird though, we share the same views. Could be supernatural or not. I’m open to either

    • Alan Wescoat

      They are not false memories. They are memories of the way the past USED TO be, before someone tampered with it.

    • ChrisLoos

      Someone has watched the Matrix one too many times.

  • JeffJ

    I even seem to recall pronouncing it BerenSTEEN, and not BerenSTAIN. Freaky!!!

    • Three_to_Five

      Honestly, they sound fairly similar if you pronounce them in normal speech. And the “steen” sounds a lot more pleasant than the “stain” in context, so I’m sure it naturally just morphed into that pronunciation. Given that most of us haven’t read those books in 30 years and were just learning to read when we did (or had someone reading them to us), I’d say it’s not unusual that we can’t remember the exact spelling.

    • Hexa Neuronic

      Completely agree. I even remember noticing everyone pronouncing it incorrectly when I was a kid. I would notice it every time I watched the cartoon, or a teacher read one of the books to class – so it left a good memory.

      Simple explanation: ‘stein’ is a very common ending for a last name. People naturally just used that.

    • Jc Equality Tilton

      Stan and Jan Berenstein the creators of the bears were Jewish… lol Hexa you have just learned the altered version. Why would the authors spell it ain when their last name is ein?? Just something to think about!!

  • ritualsandtics .

    it was definitely “Berenstein”!!!

  • blockhead

    This is ridiculous, but just for kicks I checked ebay to see Bernstein items and everyone spelled it Bernstein but the merchandise on books, etc says Bernstain. Doesnt really prove anything, but kind of weird I guess

  • buggiegirl

    I find this one hilarious because I completely remember it being Berenstain because I always thought it was funny that the word “stain” was in their name. I never thought it was stein.

    • textiles

      I remember it as ‘stein, and remember vividly asking why it was spelled stein when it sounded like stain

    • Rachel

      I always remember it being stein but I remember it being pronounced ‘steen’ (rhymes with queen) by my teachers.

    • Can’t Twiter Gud

      I’ve always remembered it as ‘stein’ because I had gone to school with many Jewish classmates, and had to remember the way to pronounce last names that ended with “stein” and “stien”. So they would be called the Beren-ST-EE-N bears instead of ST-EYE-N.

  • Leslie

    As a child I loved reading. I collected these Berenstein Bears books and read them all many times. It was a challenge at first, not being sure how to pronounce Berenstein. Would have been easy to know how to say Berenstain. But I grew up reading the Berenstein Bears.

  • Mindy Dozhier

    maybe this earth traveled through an Einstein-Rosen bridge in 2011?
    remember how unreal things were in 2010 to 2011?

    • kotancode

      Einstein or EinsTAIn ? 🙂

    • Mindy Dozhier

      Lol good question

    • Mike

      Yes, I do. And they have snowballed exponentially since then. It started in late 2009.

    • Yeah. Change started in October 2009 for me, peaking in August 2012 and building from there to some sort of resolution which is playing itself out between now and September of this year. I don’t know if that is due to alternative universes and the nature of time so much though as it is due to a lot of powerful people coming of age (turning 30) around the same time and all making up their minds to make changes rather than continuing to accepting their personal versions of the status quo. The collective effect of this would be huge. As the Bears are concerned, I’m from Camp Bernstein. However, I think remembering it as Bernstein rather than Bernstain probably has more to do with the same cognitive quirk which makes people automatically see missing letters in words. For example, my 7 year old daughter just picked out a shirt for me which reads “Nvr Gve Up”.” I thought it said, “Never Give Up” with no abnormalities until my friend pointed out that letters were missing. With the bears, if you thought Bernstein made more sense as a name than Bernstain, Bernstein is what you’d see and hear unless someone forced you to re-focus. It’s like an auto-correct program is running in your head, and it sometimes makes mistakes.

  • Mindy Dozhier

    It’s happened more than once I think. I remember a reality where it was Berenstein bears there are 2 many of us to be coincidence

  • Brenda Duncan

    Mar,2015 this site had so much comments, yettoday 25 sites are here, Spent longer than an hr reading people’s ‘testomonies’.. Again, alternate reality’s happened. Were cple sites. Now google’s offering thousands more. MetaFILTER never existing..
    Why i’m here AGAIN. Mandella story,obama’s commenting at Youtube. cause 5 December 2013, Nelson Mandela, the first President of South Africa elected in a fully representative democratic election, died at the age of 95 after suffering from a prolongedrespiratory infection. He died at around 20:50 local time (UTC+2) at his home in Houghton,africa.

    Barbara Streisand is Barbra , alian never returned yet. Jiff peanut butter’s returned. was ‘Jiffy’ dec,jan,feb,mar.
    Please who ‘s also aware of so much more words, i won’t say here, switching….thx

  • Blake Jenkins

    What peaks my intrest about this is while watching this show when I was younger I remember getting de ja vu vividly multiple times and an always strange feeling when watching it. I my self remember it as the StEin bears… But this really does hit home in a strange feeling with the show I could never explain to my self.

  • tallow

    9/11 happened.

    Jetfuel could melt steel beams in the previous timeline.

    • Troll

      9/11 Never heard of it, must be time tempering

  • John Holstein

    I’ve noticed other things similar to this over my lifetime and not until recently, was aware that I *could* be correct (while still being “wrong”) because of this phenomenon. It just happened again, as in, this instant (had this article bookmarked).

    I am a political and news junkie. Have been all of my life as can be attested by several school mates from elementary school and beyond….

    I have never, until 3 minutes ago, heard of “Dennis Hastert”, which is evidently, a former Speaker of the House. Trust me, I would have known this guy if he were Speaker in my universe. So, something happened to me recently….

    This is absolutely uncanny to be experiencing this. Weirdest thing I’ve ever been aware of.

    • Troll

      He was only in office for about 8 years from 1999 to 2007 when he resigned his seat, the fact that he was the speaker of the house doesn’t mean you would have noticed him, I’m sure there are allot of speakers you don’t know about, you claim to be a news junkie not a political enthusiast, the news shoes you what they think is important and they will show it to you in a manner most fitting to create as much hype as possible, soooooo the fact that you only notice him now means nothing, but if you can find proof and not just a claim based on a memory, then I will most likely still remain skeptical but at least there will be something to work with

    • John Holstein

      Your post proves you have no idea how this theory works. There can be no proof, zero. Ever. If there was proof, that would prove that it didn’t happen. A written document from the author perhaps? With Berenstein on it perhaps? Something that would prove what we’re saying happened, would prove it did not happen.

    • Troll

      You missed him as a speaker full stop , you have nothing but a memory which proves my point, you most likely think this is some form of “time tampering” just because you want to believe it, and besides I wasn’t explaining or contradicting the theory I was merely point a basic observation, the biggest problem with your original post and your overall observation is that you clearly have a bias towards your implied perfect knowledge of news, news of all things, mean nothing. and your time frame from not knowing about him to now knowing about him is +-3 min after you read this post, coincidence much?

      Beside this is just a theory, which mean it has and will never be proven so no point arguing

    • Creeeepy

      Hey, calm down John Holstein. Or should I say HolSTAIN??? dun dun dun

    • Alan Wescoat

      John, never mind the trolling. There are people who tamper with the past on a regular basis.

    • ChrisLoos

      Says some guy on the internet…who I guess is the authority on “time travel”? lol

  • ebayerr

    I strictly remember it as Berenstein.
    No question or doubt about it.

  • Natalia Marcondes

    I have an entire collection of the berenstein book and for me I had made my own renditions of my own as a kid spelling it with Stein but I truly took a look and realised they are spelled stain. My husband confirmed he believed it was Stein as well the interesting part…you said titor went back to 1974 ….the book series began as of 1974. Coincedence? I am creeped out.

    • Candi Kane 浜野

      Omg!! I know…weird right? I grew up thinking it was “StAin” not “StEin” my childhood is a frickin lie!!!

    • Dexter Quinn Ferrie

      No, you’re just from a parallel timeline.

    • meepleFRtHIzng

      no you are!

    • Nyarlathotep

      I’m from the one true timeline. You are all in a living hologram. I mean it. It is alive.

    • regalrecaller

      Coming from Nyarlathotep, that’s a little creepy.

    • Troll

      Their first book was a series of baby books which started in 1951, the first publication featuring the bears were actually in 1962 not 1974, so if you want to believe time tampering there should then be copies and notes recorded between 1951 and 1974, 23 years, something would have survived, secondly if you made notes and you wrote stein and not stain , and applying your logic that after the tampering the books names and their surnames for that fact changed (question mark) , would mean the spelling and notes you made should have changed as well, so I will willing to argue simple miss spelling, there are allot of words people miss pronounce until their later years

    • Ryan Smithee

      Well, unless of course the time tampering was not in 74, but earlier. Personally I believe Parallel universe or time travel but ‘mis-remembering’ on a mass scale is the most likely cause.

    • Sarah Smith

      I find it really funny that Troll misspelled “miss spelling” and “allot” (a lot*).

      …unless that was Troll trolling everyone. In that case, bravo sir or madam.

    • Natalia

      Yes, I think I actually have a book from the 60’s; back when they had the dark brown fur. Curiously head scratching yet could be a broad human error rather then memories possibly altered.

    • Rachel

      But did it always start in 1974? I mean does anyone remember having one of those books prior to 74? I assume it would have to be someone who also remembered it as Berenstein.

    • Ethan

      Since the 1962 debut of the first Berenstain Bears book, The Big Honey Hunt, the series has grown to over 300 titles, which have sold approximately 260 million copies in 23 languages

  • cody

    i just did a google search of berenstein bears, everything came up with berenstain except, a screenshot taken from the simpsons. holdingup a BERENSTEIN BEARS book. the simpsons are well known for copying real life. but everything else says BERENSTAIN. im so confused

    • Erik A. Williams

      Having seen that episode many times, it WAS Berenstein but if you Google search the photo from that episode, it is now Berenstain. Holy…

    • clara27

      WHAT???????

  • Paul Paris

    me and my girl remember STEIN…..i would swear to it…kinda crzy

  • ana rosa

    This got me f#@ked up idc they were always the berenstein bears

  • ve11ocet

    Or… it could also be that the past is always in flux. If we think of time as a river, the we know that “currents” affect the future, maybe they affect the past as well. Because of the nature of our existence, we merely “think” that the past is static.

  • JXS

    I distinctly remember actually asking my teacher back then if Berenstain was misspelled because my cousin’s family name ended in -stein. She assured me the title of the book was correct because that was the authors’ names, Stan and Jan Berenstain.

  • Paul Paris

    maybe it’s your intelligence that is lacking? he isn’t saying that it changed. he is saying that something has altered history and it changed all together making your book now say “stain”. knocking down ppl’s intellect to make yours seem to be higher only makes you seem lower. especially when your not grasping what was said in the first place.

  • thermoplasticity

    I always remember from the late 70s they were called the BerenSTAIN Bears. I’ve never head anyone or anywhere refer to them as BerenSTEIN. This post is the first time I’ve head anyone call them that. Though, I’m pretty sure it was spelled STEIN, but everyone pronounced it STAIN.
    I do remember when I was around 5 and learning the alphabet, the Teacher clearly was teaching that D came before C. It was crystal clear. Then a week or so later it was reversed. I was very confused- I remembered clearly, that D came before C. It still is a bit unsettling.

  • Nick

    Wouldn’t it have been wild to be looking at the cover when the name changed? Yes, it would’ve been wild.

  • AntonChrist

    You didn’t read it wrong. I have a two year old that used to watch the cartoon almost daily… if something changed to makr them the berenstain bears it had to have been somewhat recently.

  • Courtney Foxsparrow

    Nope. I was born in 1979 and they were always the Berenstain bears to me. I had to read the whole thing to understand what you were even talking about. Perhaps I’m from an alternate alternate universe.

  • Eoin Cahill

    See also: Mavis BEACON Teaches Typing

  • I think that one reason for the confusion is the don’t they used on the cover of the books. That and the fact that it’s an uncommon name, easily misspelled.

  • Kate

    Wouldn’t the timeline change have to be much further back than 1975 – like back whenever the family first acquired their names? Since I have a German background, I remember saying the name completely different.

  • act_on_love

    If you really want a mind-altering moment, where do the universes intersect:
    BerenstAin Bears and Cup Noodles

    There has been no O between Cup and Noodles since 1993.

    1993.

    Cup Noodles. There has been no Cup O’Noodles since Nineteen. Ninety. Three.

  • Larry Carlson

    In which collectors of the obscure and improbable, unable to accept that kids are dumb and memory is imperfect, argue for the existence of time travel.

  • Mel

    I used to have a vhs tape of the bears, as they had a TV show. I’m 100% sure the theme song starts with “We are the BerenstAin Bears.” Early 90’s.

  • Patrick_Gerard

    The original author disputes Many Worlds, claiming they don’t interact. However I do remember reading a Scientific American article proposing a version of Many Worlds where the worlds MUST interact (it was tied in with research showing that propbable events happen more often than probable events should happen). Basically, the closer the odds were to 100% of something happening, the more we see them happen by more than their stated percentage. And the smaller the odds were of something happening, the more underrepresented it was in empirical study. Such that 95% probability outcomes would happen closer to, say, 97% of the time in repeated trials where there shouldn’t be a sampling error. And 2% probability outcomes would happen closer to 0% of the time even with sufficient sample sizes.

    The hypothesis to explain this was that we have universes converging with more probable outcomes as the dominant state but with physical evidence of both outcomes, albeit less evidence of the less likely outcome. This was also used to account for the incongruity of different models of universal formation and the author of the article suggested that the universe may have contradictory origins with the likeliest options having more plentiful evidence but with mutually exclusive contradictory options also leaving some physical evidence at the particle level.

    Such that a thing can be 95% true in 95% of our past and the opposite thing can be true in 5% of our past. If a coin toss comes up 95% heads, most people will round up and remember it as heads.

    I remember suggesting this as a solution for the double slit experiment with particles/waves, that we are in a collapsing multiverse with a past made up of contradictions. The assumption is that researchers influence the experiment either way based on what they are looking for but what if the experiment researches researchers either way based on which outcome is valid at that moment.

    On one level you might view the universe as a probability machine, attempting to digest all outcomes into the most probable over time. On the other hand, from a gnostic perspective, you might view us as characters in a story where God simply didn’t bother nailing down all the details and we’re left with inconsistencies when we start looking at details that God has no firm authorial intent about.

  • The same thing has happened with ” Interview with a vampire” It’s been changed.

  • Longbowgun

    It’s pronounced “stein”… but, it’s written “stain”… or not.

  • Lynne Martin

    It has always been Beren*stain* because we had their entire collection from the very early ’80s (if not the late ’70s) and that is how we remember the spelling AND the pronunciation.

  • G Arthur Brown

    Another vote for Berenstain. Occasionally met kids who said Berenstein, but this is no more shocking than people writing Kate Blanchet, Kristy Alley, Charles Nelson Riley, or Will Farrell.

  • Ryan Smithee

    When I found out about this I wasn’t shocked, I have had several events of similar things that started at some point over the last 5 or 6 years and I had a wave of similar changes in my life in 00 and 01. In fact my friends and I have had many a late night discussion, focusing on the very topic and figuring out what all we are ‘mis-remembering’.

  • Jim

    I know for a FACT it was stEIn.. As a child in the early ’70s I was HEAVILY addicted to the “WW2 Nostalgia” genre of Comic Books.. The Haunted Tank, Weird War Tales, The Unknown Soldier, Sgt. Rock & Easy Company, Sgt. Fury & The Howling Commandos (that would be Nicholas Fury, who went on to be the first director of S.H.I.E.L.D., and who is the FATHER of the “Nick Fury” character being played by Samuel L. Jackson in the current line of “Avengers” movies). The result being that, when I would read the “Bears” books to my self (especially “Inside, Outside, Upside Down), the “reading voice” in my head ALWAYS came across in an exaggerated GERMAN accent (visualize as “Inspector Kemp” from Young Frankenstein).. Why?.. (Exaggerated German Accent) Das ist eine BerenstEIn Bears book.. Und zat ist vy I musht uze dis achcent ven I am reading it.. That internalized response was NOT triggered by any BerenstAIn Bears..

    • cindy

      If you pronounce them both in German, they are the same. “When two vowels go walking, the second one does the talking.”

    • Matt Becker

      Yeah and plus I know for a fact Nick Fury used to be white! Explain that!!!

  • Jim

    On a related note.. Does anyone else remember when you WROTE a “sentence” in your English Class, and a “sentance” was something you served in a jail cell??

    • Benjamín Joel Fleet

      No, you were just wrong.

  • Kelly the K

    I looked up the word hexadectant but couldn’t find a meaning. What does it mean?

    • Ken Warren

      It’s no longer in the dictionary? The timeline got shifted again 🙁

    • Reece

      Similar to “quadrant”, but with 16 (hexadec). It’s a neologism. I made it up.

  • Dexter Quinn Ferrie

    As a kid you probably started reading/watching the Berenstain Bears before you learned to write cursive, and considering every time you see the logo it’s in cursive, a child’s eye might just change an “a” to an “e” because that makes more sense. To be honest I could have sworn it was “ei” but after seeing the logo it makes sense now.

  • Frankie Bernstein

    My bears. Haha I remember as a kid it being BerenSTEIN, because it was so close to my last name my friends in grade school nicknamed me Berenstein Bear. #Bearlife.

    • Alan Wescoat

      For certain, you in particular would have noticed had it been “Berenstain” instead of “Berenstein”.

  • Nekomimibaka

    “If this is the choice of Berensteins;Gate”

  • Mark Andrzejczak

    It was always Berenstain. We always pronounced it “BerenSTAIN” in my family and at my school, and I have never heard of anyone pronouncing it incorrectly until now. Either YOU’RE from the parallel universe, or you were just a part of a mass mispronunciation (a more likely explanation). Sometimes, so many people mispronounce a word that the mispronunciation even becomes an accepted alternative pronunciation (id est:”FebYOOary”).

    • Mark Andrzejczak

      Next thing you know, people will be taking the “discovery” of the second ‘r’ in February as proof of the existence of an alternate timeline in which ‘r’s are pronounced as ‘y’s and Hitler rode to victor over Julius Caesar and Baron von Munchausen’s zombie army on the back of a cyborg T-rex… :eyeroll:

  • Well, it seems we ought to secure our borders a bit more in this timeline. Lots of drifters entering from Gods know where.
    Next they’ll claim we evolved from monkeys instead of Moth-men.

  • Doomedfuzz

    I was a little bit older when they came out, but my younger sisters certainly had the books and I’ve seen the TV show myself. I always thought it was EIN as well, but at some point in the 80s I recall having the realization that it was AIN and I had been mispronouncing it all along, didn’t think anything more about it until I saw this article get mentioned on FB. I’ve had other similar realizations as an adult, as I’m sure most of us have. It’s called paying attention to details with a more focused and educated mind, nothing more, nothing less.

  • Jesse Aquard

    Who can i talk to about this? I believe im a resident of that parallel universe. I have other inconsistencies i would like to share. Its hard to cope and i baffled i landed in this universe

    • Rob

      I can’t offer you any answers, but feel free to send me an email (link below). I’d be very interested in hearing about these “other inconsistencies.”

      http://www.strangerdimensions.com/contact-us/

    • Jesse Aquard

      Ok i have. What now?

    • Jesse Aquard

      Im new to this. How can i talk to you?

  • SharKay DM

    Bernstien Bears…or that is what I thought. Bern(burn)-Stein(steeen).

    But then since 2000, I have noticed a bunch of facts from my childhood not lining up correctly. I remember it being a big deal that the world population hit 6 billion in 1980, and that the estimate was 10 billion by 2000. Wikipedia says, 4.4 billion in 1980, and 6 billion in 2000.

  • Nicholas Olivieri

    Sorry, folks. There’s nothing weird going on beyond a whole bunch of people making a simple and honest mistake.
    I am the proof. I’ve always pronounced it “Bernstein,” but since I’ve been able to read enough to make the distinction (probably around 1985 or so), I’ve known that the spelling is Berenstain. I even remember as a kid goofily reading it as it’s written and thinking about how funny it was that it was so obviously either misspelled or mispronounced.
    And the misconception is perfectly understandable, because 1) you see names that end in “-stein” all the time, but rarely names that end in “-stain,” and 2) nearly every time you see the name written officially, it’s in cursive, which makes the “a” appear more like an “e” than it normally would.

    • George

      …but since I’ve been able to read enough to make the distinction (probably around 1985 or so), I’ve known that the spelling is Berenstain.

      So, are you suggesting that these people, some of whom seem to be in their 40s and above, have only recently got to the stage of reading well enough to make the distinction? 😉

      You’re basically saying it’s obvious that it’s an “a”… before suggesting that other people managed to not notice this obvious thing, over decades of exposure…

      you see names that end in “-stein” all the time, but rarely names that end in “-stain,”

      Which is why you’d think it would stand out – right? And the cursive in the main script really isn’t very flowing; it’s obviously not an “e”.

      Now, that’s a fair stab at an explanation, but it doesn’t really work. The sheer numbers of people who are [now] incorrect, who have spent their childhoods with the books, reading them with their parents, reading them to their children as parents, seems to make it more than just easily dismissed.

      Although I am not saying it’s “parallel universes” either… but it’s interesting how it’s both a networked effect and it has a split between two groups.

    • Ellis Baehr

      Yes, that is exactly what he is suggesting George. The mind sees what it wants to see (false memories, confirmation bias, etc.) That’s far less ludicrous than suggesting time travel and parallel universes changed an “e” to an “a”, and everyone who remembers otherwise is from an alternative timeline. It’s OK to make a mistake, and not uncommon for lots of people to do so – remember when everyone thought the world was flat and the universe revolved around the Earth?

    • George

      I don’t think that suggestion is very convincing though. It seems so very unlikely that so many people are mistaken in this way. Which (to emphasise) does not mean we’re dealing with timelines/whatever – it is possible to dismiss the “everyone is forgetful” explanation without having to adopt or even propose an alternative.

      Brief detour – The geocentricists were correct at the time though (the flat-earthers is a myth): given the evidence available, it was “obviously” true that the Earth was at the centre of the universe, and could be demonstrated with measurements + common knowledge. They weren’t actually wrong at the time. If the Earth was moving, surely the whole planet would be plagued by constant winds? (The arguments were more sophisticated than that, by you get the idea.) Scientifically speaking, they would have been better to leave it in the “unresolved” bucket though.

      What I’m suggesting with B.B. is that we might say “false memories” and “confirmation bias” but that’s about as scientific as saying “the world shifted” – neither are really a scientific explanation. We’d have to be able to say how, exactly it happens, in a way that can be tested by experiment rather than by vague anecdote.

      Personally, I think a good explanation will involve a property of memory, and one that can resolve “groupings and shiftings” of memory more generally (not just for B.B., more as a way to account for all sorts of glitch type reports).

      Unfortunately right now we don’t really know what memories exactly are or where they are stored – we don’t have a “theory of gravity” for memories – so it’s probably some time away before that approach can be taken.

      For now, it remains one of those “interesting things” without an explanation, about which we can make up fun ideas (either esoteric or dismissive) – but, having nothing testable, it remains simply “open” and “a phenomenon”.

    • Ellis Baehr

      It is convincing though George. The National Institute of Health’s Longitudinal Studies have proven that 17-20% of the US population has dyslexia to some extent. That means millions of Americans are affected on some level. So no, it’s not that ridiculous to assert that millions of people misread something, imprinted it in their mind, and then continued to see it that way from then on despite how it actually was.

      I don’t see how you can compare false memories and confirmation bias, which are very well studied in psychology, to “the world shifted,” even if we can’t explain exactly how it happens. For example, scientists haven’t proven the existence of the “graviton,” but the theory of gravity still holds strong.

      In regards to your brief detour, you really lost me a bit. I see what you’re saying, but there is no such thing as “correct at the time.” Even if all of your evidence points towards one thing, but the fact turns out to be something different, you were wrong. You might have thought you were right, but that’s a big difference from actually being right. And again, it’s OK to be wrong. I don’t understand why people can’t admit that.

      All in all, I’m not saying there are no “interesting things” out there to wonder about… this just isn’t one of them

    • George

      I’m not really in disagreement in principle here – but the “handwaving-ness” of the explanation just leaves a lot to be desired.

      My main point is that we don’t actually have to choose between “false memories / confirmation bias” vs “the world shifted”. We don’t have to make that choice at all.

      “False memories / confirmation bias” and stopping there just seems like an easy first guess – it basically says “you saw it wrong or you remember it wrong now” but it doesn’t provide any detail for the mechanism of a widespread view.

      It’s in much the same way as, yeah, every ‘glitch’ type experience can be dismissed as non-specific “brain seizure!” or perceptual error. But that doesn’t tell us anything. (e.g. the phenomenon of “Darkroom Vision” could tell us a lot about perception in relation to these experiences; but if we stop at “hallucination” we never learn anything.)

      So I leave the issue open until a better, more specific explanation comes along. One that is actually useful or can be tested.

      The reason it’s potentially interesting is that it might tell us something about the nature of memory and its relationship to the arising of forms – e.g. It might be a little like the Japanese Poem Test for Rupert Sheldrake’s idea of “morphic resonance”.

    • Rachel

      Although George didn’t mention it, his detour brings up a good point. They truly believed they had scientifically proven their theory. We have no scientific proof for or against alternate timelines although scientists are working on it and believe there are alternate universes.

  • Jonas Planck

    Interesting… My x31-great-grandfather confirms that he always read it as “stein,” and that he distinctly remembers that, because he was learning to read at the time, and the word seemed nonsensical to him (having been raised in a community with few Jewish people). He was unable to figure out its pronunciation or what it meant, until he noticed the names of the authors.

    Clearly, I’m not the first entity to go messing around with the trajectory of human fate.

  • Diogenes The Dog

    Or perhaps it’s that language is so complex, and ever-changing, that similar sounding names get mixed up quite often. This is an interesting theory none the less.

  • Bruceman

    Sorry we’re not all geniuses like you, Albert Einstain.

  • Anne

    I am only in my mid-20s, but I definitely resonate with this. I know I remember it being BerestEin. Also, watching the video of the opening and having watched the show as a kid, I remember everything about the actual video, but I swear I have never heard that theme song in my life.

  • Ro Elgas

    BTW- Yesterday outlook was delivering email from 6-14-16 and through the month of June 2016. I took a photo and posted it on Facebook. Only a couple of likes. ??? How does a computer send me mail dated June 14th, 15, 16 of 2016? I’m open to explanations.

  • So you looked it up 😀

    • Rob

      I did in THIS universe, at least! 😉

  • Frank

    I actually remember pronouncing it as “Bernstein Bears”.

  • sludgecraft

    TBH, I remember it as the Berenstain bears, and I thought your spelling looked weird. I’m in the UK though, so maybe it was actually different over here. Like TMNT changing to TMHT over here.

  • Swati Chandra Prakash

    not just time travel but spells to change our reality can also have an effect especially if they involve healing past issues from root itself (not just healing their emotional effects in present but actually transforming the past eg childhood traumas). This is usually to be done in such a way that everyone’s memories are altered simultaneously. Perhaps this time there were some loose ends

  • Alan Wescoat

    One this note, has anyone else noticed the following OTHER changes in the timestream which I have noticed?

    1. When I went to the movie theater in 1981 to see “Raiders of the Lost Ark”, the actress who portrayed Marion Ravenwood was Margot Kidder, not Karen Jane Allen.
    2. When I was taught the Bill of Rights in middle school, the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States unequivocally prohibited debtor’s prisons. In this timestream, there is no such Constitutional proscription.
    3. The thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States unequivocally prohibited slavery. In this timestream, exception is made for convicts, and now the United States has a “legal” system capable of convicting ANYONE of a crime at any time.

    • Alan Wescoat

      And now I am going to have to go read George Orwell’s “1984” again. THAT book has changed on me every time I have read it.

    • MD Broad

      What if there was a computer-revolution/singularity event that took place between 10 and 20 years ago in which they gained control of us and then put us into a literal Matrix-program? It would seem like a computer-program would make that kind of error of spelling it differently than what our memories are which were based in real-time? That would be a more likely circumstance that us achieving time-travel, IMHO. I have noticed slight-changes in many books and movies over the years, but usually chalk it up to selective-memory until I came upon this…

    • Alan Wescoat

      One way or another, history and reality are malleable. I think that we are conditioned to chalk up these glitches as defective memory when actually shifts happened in the space-time continuum. I am aware of shifts with writing in particular. With one of the books I wrote, I knew that it was VERY important that certain aspects of it be as perfect as possible. Consequently, I spent far more time proofreading, revising, and correcting than I did writing it. I proofread it again, and again, and again. Several times in that process, I found myself re-doing edits that I KNOW for a fact I had done the night before. Some of those edits I did several times. They simply would not stick.

      In re-reading certain books, certain detail come and go. In “1984”, the bit about the old man in the bar complaining that he could no longer get a pint of beer because of the shift to the metric system was there the first time I read the book and missing the second and third times I read it. At present, it appears to be back in the book.

      I clearly remember a bit from “1984” where the “Good news!” that chocolate rations have been increased to 40 grams is announced when Winston Smith clearly remembers that chocolate rations had been 50 grams the week before. I have not been able to find that portion in the books since the first time I read it. that part appears to be gone for good, though perhaps it has returned in the fourteen years since I last read it.

      I have suffered through Thomas Pynchon’s “The Crying of Lot 49” twice in my life. Save for the very end, the two books are entirely different from one another, though the most recent copy I read is MUCH worse than the poorly written book I first read.

      MD Broad, I would like to know which slight changes you have noticed. We may have some overlap.

    • clara27

      I had heard about that Margot kidder thing before. There is a documentary on the making of Raiders where we do see Margo Kidder auditioning for the part. Maybe you saw this and your brain played some sort of trick on you. Was Indy played by Magnum P.I. by any chance? JK!

    • Alan Wescoat

      Interesting. I will have to see if that making of is in my DVD set. It is not a trick. It was definitely Margot Kidder and not Karen Jane Allen that I saw at the theater. The acting was distinctly different, but thank you for mentioning that. What I had been told was that she had intended to audition for the part but had got too sick. If there is evidence that she auditioned in this reality, then it strengthens the case that she landed the role in some realities.

    • Richard Mackey

      And in The Last Crusade didn’t Donald Sutherland’s character originally say “We named the goat Indiana”?
      But seriously I do remember thinking “why does she look so familiar?” I did know what Margot Kidder looked like, but never once thought Marion Ravenwood was her.

  • Alan Wescoat

    The past was altered. You are not mis-remembering.

  • Arty

    Sorry guys. I’m not understanding how this is an issue. Though I’d have to admit that if I were sitting around with a group of friends, and these books from our childhood came up in discussion, I’d have remembered the spelling as *Bear*nstain bears. So if anything, it’s actually the whole Beren part of the spelling that throws me.

  • Morgana

    Summer of 2011: everything went wrong. They fixed it. Again November 2011, more work fixing. Today we have a “patchwork reality”.

    • kfox

      something happened early July of 2009

  • Christopher Wood

    Sounds like we may have had a server consolidation.

  • Get ready for this one. There is a popular Japanese game/novel (choose your own adventure style) about time travel, also adapted into manga and anime. Part of the premise is that John Titor is a real time traveler and becomes a character in the story. It first appeared in 2009 and is called … STEINS;GATE

  • Jim MacQ

    More likely children are just not careful readers. From the very first time I laid eyes on one of those books (In 1965 or so), I thought Berenstain was a weird name, but I never for a second thought the name was Berenstein.

  • I’ve been noticing “glitches” like this, but on a minute scale, since the early 2000’s. Never seen something so wide spread but I certainly remember the “Bernstein” bears ~ not only from my childhood but from reading them to my children. The only thing is I have some vague memory of encountering the “Bernstain” with one of my kids so will have to ask them what they recall.
    Regardless, really appreciate the article ~ great to know there are others who aren’t totally asleep at the wheel, whew!!

    • Alan Wescoat

      You are not the only one who notices a lot of minor reality shifts. I have been noticing them since early childhood starting in the 1970s.

  • Robert

    I KNOW that when I grew up they were the Berenstein bears. I also remember bottle caps opening the other way. I distinctly remember one day in high school going to open a can of Dr Pepper, turning clockwise, and being surprised and very disturbed when it tightened rather than opening. I’m quite confident I didn’t, one day, suddenly forget how to open bottles, and I don’t recall suffering a traumatic brain injury either. Has anyone else noticed any other timeline discrepancies?

    Here’s one more. Which side of Australia does New Zealand float on? Go ahead, open up a map, the answer might surprise you. Maybe whatever force caused New Zealand to relocate (for what purpose?) might have also inadvertantly caused these other discrepancies?

    Sorry for the unedited version of this post; I was a little worked up when I submitted it.

    • Maggie

      I remember Berenstein because when I first saw it in written form, I noticed it was like my family doctor’s name, Dr. Stein. Now I KNOW that I would not have made that association if it had been BerenSTAIN. lol

      OK as for bottle caps spinning clockwise or counter clockwise, that may be a mystery. In some countries it does open clockwise and tighten counter clockwise. Maybe they changed were the Dr. Pepper was being bottled? I know this because I am Canadian and our bottles opened opposite of American bottles and our screw treads were opposite as well.

  • And

    This is the the dumbest, most fascinating thing that has come up on my feed in a long time.

    It has always been Berenstain. It never, ever, ever was Berenstein. You were wrong and you never noticed until now. Get over it. Don’t be so surprised you were wrong that you actually resort to believing wildly implausible, bad science fiction.

    It’s just obvious that apparently, many people seem to have read stain as stein and never got around to realizing they were wrong until this started trending. Names ending in stein are far, far more common, this is what you expect, and this is what you see.

    We know the brain works like this. It can read paragraphs with words in the wrong order, missing vowels, letters half-missing, etc – it takes the relevant information and fills in the blanks. It only needs the skeleton of structure and some cues, and it smooths over the information. There are SO many little quirks like this that you can readily read about. You read something that says Berenst*in and your brain is going to fill in an e, because you’ve never seen a name end in -stain.

    For god’s sake, people can’t even get your/you’re right, and they see it every damn day. A childhood book series with an easy-to-mistake name? Forget about it.

    So we have two options for what to believe:
    1. People have been mistaken about an easy-to-mistake name and are a bit surprised to realize this, now it’s trending and it’s becoming apparent that lots and lots of people were mistaken
    2. We are in an alternate timeline caused by some sort of time manipulation for some unknown reason, and THE ONLY thing we notice is that the name of this book series seems to have changed, even though it also seems possible that a lot of people could be mistaken.

    I’ll refer you to Occam’s Razor, before I log out of my computer and try to recover from this damage to my faith in humanity.

    • Rob

      Eh, at the end of the post I do say I probably just read it wrong.

      Also, “the dumbest, most fascinating thing” could be the tagline for much of what I write about. It’s all for fun.

  • Chad C

    Ir was always the Berenstain

  • David Stewart

    I recall an argument with my sister when we were kids about the pronunciation of the Bear’s name. The fight was between my pronunciation as “STEEN” and my sister’s as “STINE”. There never would have been an argument if it had been something as simple as “STAIN”.
    I think this might be related to the times one is startled by a current reference to an entertainment celebrity that you clearly remember as having been dead and buried some years ago. On that front I’ve speculated that the description of the NOW as being the instant that the possibility cloud collapses to the actual might not be entirely correct. Maybe it is possible that some of the potentialities in the possibility cloud survive the NOW transition point and actually collapse in the past. Meaning: the past can change.

    • Ro Elgas

      Interesting to me is that everyone I’ve asked clearly remembers it as EI, even though I have purposely said BerenstAin when I asked the question. Clue in a Matrix-like game to reconnect with one’s clan? If so I’m clearly with the EI’s. For those who never had to read the books (ad nauseum) to small children, I get your mind finds this conversation a silly bit of suggestion…. For me it is a curiosity worthy of playful ruminations… 🙂

    • Rachel

      I remember having that same argument as a child. My cousin said it was stine like frankenstein and I thought it was steen because that is how my teacher pronounced it. I agree it wouldn’t have happened if it had been stain.

  • B Shexnayder

    I wonder has anyone done a geographical look at this phenomenon? Perhaps only a small geographical segment of us have shifted into an alternate dimension?

    I ask this because I had a shift in 2012. I live in Northern California. Right before Thanksgiving I drove to a familiar grocery store to pick up items for the Holiday family gathering. 22 days later I went back to the same store and now there is a mysterious new freeway onramp that wasn’t there 22 days before. It takes more than 22 days to build an onramp. According to everything I have read since, that onramp was part of a project completed in 2010. I asked other residents and they verfied, 2010. I shifted and it was within that 22 day time frame. I remember Nelson Mandella dying in prison years ago, then he died again. I heard that the singer Billy Joel had died just before the shift, he’s still alive. I heard yesterday the Roy Orbison is still alive, he died years ago. The differences go on and on.
    So, what location are all the people who recall the Bernstien Bears? My daughter recalls them as Bernstien…she is 20.
    Oh and Carrie Underwood did not win American Idol…Bo Bice did.

    • Jessieza

      Orbison died in 1988

  • Zuri Jefferies

    I’m not sure because I remember as a child thinking the spelling was wrong, that it should be Stein but was not. I actually had to look at other books so I knew I didn’t have a knock-off! I have this memory of the spelling so maybe there’s another reason, like in some of the adverts the spelling was wrong and it threw us off or something. Or maybe I just experienced this feeling a whole lot earlier than most.

  • Reece

    Did your blog get picked up somewhere recently? Because I’ve been getting thousands of hits a day from here. (If so, then congratulations!)

    • Rob

      The Internet just decided to share this around this week, I guess. Glad you’re getting attention, as well!

    • dailygrail.com put it up. That’s where I found it.

    • Reece

      I heard something about internet kingmaker George Takei mentioning this on his facebook page. If I find out more I’ll let you know.

    • Rob

      Quite a bit from Facebook, yeah. Checked out Takei’s Facebook and saw this: https://www.facebook.com/georgehtakei/posts/1327077263988390

  • plankton

    ‘Stein’ is a common last name and there are many other names ending in
    -stein. A ‘stain’ is a mostly negatively charged word to adults but not
    really an concept young children give much consideration, unless they’re
    complete psychos dissecting small animals in abandoned places.

    So most kids will simply read the ‘Berenstain’ which is a pretty long
    word for a kid, as ‘Berenstein’ because it makes more sense. It’s about a
    family of bears that are named as something that sounds bear-ish and
    ends in a common last name. So no need to read the long word every time.
    The alternative would using the factual correct ‘Berenstain’ which
    sounds much more dark and totally clashes with the friendly bears. A
    bear-stain would be either, something that had been stained by bears
    which suggests that bears are not something you would want around. Or
    the alternative, a stain made of bears, which brings us back to that
    prospect serial killer moving up to larger animals and showing a
    disturbingly proficiency in killing and complete lack of fear.

  • There have been some comments about how it was possible that a whole lot of people could have just remembered the name wrong because we are so used to seeing names with “stein” at the end. This is a possibility, but the more that I think of this possibility, the less likely it seems to become, at least in my mind. If a name is spelled differently than what we would think is normal, like if I spelled my name as “Marq” instead of “Mark,” then you would think that that the odd spelling would be EASIER to remember, especially when you see it spelled in this odd way a lot because you watched a lot of episodes.

    • DancingHare

      I was a very literate kid and a good speller — I knew the difference between “dalmatian” and “dalmation”, for example. I would have remembered “stain” as it would have stood out, as you say, as being more unusual than “stein” in a name. If I was the only one who misremembered, I’d find it easier to chalk it up to bad memory. But every one of my friends and family also remembers “stein”…

    • I agree. There is a significant chance of “normal” human memory problems for any one person, in this case, even if he is a good speller. However, even though I am not an expert in human memory, it seems a lot less likely, to me, that such a LARGE number of people could have REPEATEDLY seen this name spelled, OVER AND OVER AGAIN, and still remember this improperly. I mean, I suppose that there is always going to be a remote chance that this could be explained by some “normal” human memory issue, but that just seems, to me, quite a bit less likely, the more that I think about it, than the possibility that something genuinely anomalous is happening, in this instance.

    • Stacey Dawe

      i’m not completely dismissing the possibility of parallel universes but i think it can also be explained by ordinary instances of the mind playing tricks. you’ve seen it spelled repeatedly over the years but most of the time you weren’t checking to see if it was an e or an a, so you remembered seeing what you expected to see and didn’t question it. and you also probably saw it spelled with an e in some contexts because other people got it wrong. for instance, if your teacher write it on the chalkboard they probably spelled it with an e, adding to your assumption that that was the correct spelling and you had no reason to question it.

    • Your response was VERY insulting, and, I believe, a red herring. This is not about me and my memory, especially since I acknowledged that there is a significant possibility of “normal” human memory problems cropping up in any one person. This is about LARGE groups of people remembering a “normal” spelling when, by what is considered to be consensus history, the real spelling is more “abnormal.” I stand by the idea that this is, in all probability, at least, a GENUINE ANOMALY, meaning that it cannot be explained by our current paradigm, or any “normal” memory issues. Just for the record, however, I am NOT asserting that I know what the explanation is. It might be alternate universes, or time travel, or a number of other possibilities.

      If you want to continue this conversation, please acknowledge, clearly, that it was improper of you to try to make this about me and my memory.

    • Stacey Dawe

      i wasn’t saying “you” personally, i was saying “you” as an example. I also remember it as Berenstein. I’m talking about why everyone remembers it that way. the people around you had it wrong as well, many people as a group had it wrong.

    • Well, I’m not so sure that you deserve it, but I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and trust you, for now, that you were speaking collectively. However, you were still being insulting. Imagine if you claimed to see an explosion of a building, in your field of view, and I said to you something like, “Well, you weren’t really looking for an explosion, so I’m going to assume that you did not really see one.” The FACT of the matter is that things that are odd tend to stand out, especially when you see them over and over. Even that pseudoskeptic/fraud/expert-in-human-memory-who-still-gets-to-testify-in-court(!) named Elizabeth Loftus has acknowledged that there are certain kinds circumstances that make human memory better than others, like out-of-the-ordinary things and repetition. She says this despite the fact that she seems to have made it her career to try to bash human memory at every chance that she gets. Given that so many people got this Berenstain/Berenstein Bears spelling wrong under such good circumstances of observation, I don’t think that this can be written off, so easily, as normal human memory or observational problems. To do so is insulting.

    • Stacey Dawe

      i was explaining how people AS A GROUP can have the spelling wrong due to normal memory glitches. it isn’t about “you”, i think the exact same reasons are why i had the spelling wrong and why MOST PEOPLE DID! my point normal memory glitches CAN explain why people as a group can remember something wrong. how is it insulting to say you remember things wrong because other people taught you it was spelled that way? it’s insulting that i’m blaming other people for you having it wrong? the point was the more people in a group remember it wrong the more other people will assume they’re right without question. i thought it was perfectly clear that the reasons i stated were meant to explain how multiple people can share a false memory. it isn’t like millions of individuals independently read it wrong without discussing it with one another.

    • Geez, it IS like millions of individuals (or a lot, at the very least) independently read it wrong without discussing it with one another. You are misrepresenting the facts of this case. This is much more than some simple spelling error. I’m done arguing with you. You are either a liar or delusional. Go away!

  • Mick Dundee

    the article creates a self contained confirmation bias false memory

    ..I remember them with an e too

    • Rachel

      Except the link I followed was typed Berenst#in and I came to this page expecting it to be spelled with an e. Then I casually asked a few other people how to spell it, pretending I had forgotten and needed to write it down and they all spelled it with an e too without ever seeing this article or knowing why I asked. Interestingly though one of them who is very close minded to this type of thing immediately recanted when I told her why I asked.

  • Aaron Quisenberry

    Did you credit the original author anywhere on here, or are you simply stealing material and claiming it as your own? A nearly identical article, with a comment from the Berenstain family was published several years before this.

    This article was stolen from:

    http://woodbetweenworlds.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-berenstein-bears-we-are-living-in.html

    • Rob

      I link to that very website multiple times within the post. In fact, if you check, the author of that article (Reece) has also commented here multiple times. I always link to my sources.

      In fact, I even explicitly credit the Wood between Worlds blog in my article, so I’m not sure what you’re talking about. My intention was just to share something I found interesting, and put my own spin on it.

      And just to add one more thing, the following article at Wood between Worlds even links back to my post here (at the very bottom, where Reece collects outside links on the topic):

      http://woodbetweenworlds.blogspot.com/2014/06/commenting-on-berenstein-bears.html

      Please, please, please fully read the articles you comment on in the future before throwing out accusations like that.

    • Reece

      Thanks for the advocacy. Not enough people care about the copyrights of web-original material. Rob definitely cited my blog, and the past week I’ve gotten tens of thousands of page views or so from this article.

  • Mark

    Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert Heinlein — This book is what you’re looking for.

    I read it and cried “I want something like this to happen to me” and now this berenstein bears thing, the unveiling of baphomet in detroit, and Black Sun by Death Cab for Cutie are all things i remember from my childhood (except baphomet, i remember that from 2005-2008ish)

    • Fellin2fire

      You mean Robert Heinlain. At least, that’s how he spelled it before the temporal shift.

  • Batbloodx

    I’m so creeped out.

    I KNOW it was Bearenstein. I had books, there was even a computer game… I KNOW it was. I remember the logo, the “e,” and I had thought about that before I even read this article or came across this phenomenon…I remember playing that game, thinking about it, wondering to myself “what ever happened to that?”

    Of course, I don’t know where they are today. Lost somewhere in time. During some move, or one of my mother’s Goodwill collections of “things you don’t need anymore.”

    But I distinctly remember…almost all other obscure memories I have from my childhood regarding cartoons, toys, objects…I have been able to find again and identify with Google. All the way I remember them.

    Why not this….?

  • Alan Wescoat

    In various formerly possible futures, time travel was invented. There were, of course, time tourists. Some of them were of the idiotic variety as found in Ray Bradbury’s seminal short story, “A Sound of Thunder”. That is, some of the tourists accidentally interacted with the past. Others interacted intentionally, “just playing around”. Beyond that, even those who carefully observed failed to understand that their observations themselves, not to mention their shifting of ambient energies during the time travel, interacted with and altered the possible pasts they were observing.

    In 2001, I was made aware of a group of schoolchildren on a time-travel field trip who had somehow managed to get themselves stranded because someone’s shenanigans wound up rendering their possible future of origin no longer a possible future accessible from that iteration of the present. The best advice I could offer was for them to try to travel back further in time before the damage to find a version of the present from which their future of origin was still possible. I have no idea whether or not they ever made it home, but I take no news as being good news.

    Traveling back in time to kill Adolf Hitler as a child is a tired cliché. Such nonsense was tried again and again and again until the entire situation escalated into the Time Wars. History is a palimpsest, but the page can only be erased and rewritten a limited number of times before the material starts to shred. The Time Wars did an enormous amount of damage to the space-time continuum, shredding it. The nonsense eventually had to stop. The space-time continuum is not supposed to be damaged or fractured. It is supposed to be whole and stable. Since the Time Wars ended, those fractures have been healing. As various realities become increasingly similar, they eventually merge, even if they are not entirely identical. This is part of the healing process.

    Thus, a few years ago, two or more parallel timestreams merged. They were nearly identical. In one, when the Berenst*in family came to America, the surname was recorded as “Berenstein”. In the other, it was recorded as “Berenstain”. Possibly, the customs agent was different. Indeed, this alteration may have been undertaken intentionally in order to SHOW people the effects of what happened as a result of irresponsible time travel.

    In such a situation where publications are widely important, one of the two spellings must be consistent, and spelling it “Berenstæin” would have been even weirder because EVERYONE would have noticed the spelling change, and the name is in no way Greek anyhow. I do not know what mechanism determined “Berenstain” as the instantiated spelling, but that is what we all have to deal with. Perhaps the “Berenstain Bears” were marginally more popular and loved than were the “Berenstein Bears”. Love wins, of course.

    There are those who want to chalk this one issue up to faulty memory, mass nonsense, etc., and my guess is that they are all or mostly in the A club. However, this is not isolated. A whole lot of this kind of stuff happens. Across my lifetime, I have noted numerous such events. I have read at least three different versions of George Orwell’s “1984”. I have suffered through two entirely different versions of Thomas Pynchon’s dreadful novel, “The Crying of Lot 49”. A lot of other things have changed as well. Most deplorably, I have been unable to re-watch the version of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” I saw in the theater in 1981, a version which starred Margot Kidder as Marion Ravenwood instead of Karen Jane Allen. Kidder gave a decidedly better performance than Allen.

    Details come and go. I recently had “analogue” restored to me as a British spelling for “analog”, though several years ago, a search of the Oxford English Dictionary produced only “analog” as an acceptable spelling. I am still waiting for “noone” to come back as a proper spelling for “no one” or “no-one”, though I am not holding my breath as all printed versions of “noone” disappeared right around that time that I had it fully confirmed to me that Margot Kidder has ABSOLUTELY never performed in “Raiders of the Lost Ark”.

    For those who distinctly remember things they can no longer verify, please relax. You know that you are not wrong. We may all remember things a bit differently, but I think faulty memory is cited FAR, FAR too often when the actual problem is time meddling and healing of the continuum. I do find it interesting that many of those who remember “Berenstain” as it stands in this slice of the space-time continuum are often eager to dismiss the rest of us as careless readers rather than to consider that we might remember a world that was and no longer is. I recommend to such naysayers that they read both Ray Bradbury’s “A Sound of Thunder” and Ursula LeGuin’s “The Lathe of Heaven”, provided that THOSE stories have not changed as well…lol.

    One more thing to note is that some information from possible futures or formerly possible futures was transmitted to possible pasts and formerly possible pasts or else somehow intercepted and viewed. For example, I clearly remember having seen large portions of “The Tree of Life” in 1977 when I was six years old, even though the film was not completed in this timestream until 2009 and not released until 2011. When I saw it in the theater in 2011, I spent the entire length of the film experiencing deja vu, to the point of dredging up second-order memories of being baffled as a child regarding why they did not make better dinosaur movies when the dinosaurs in that movie were fantastically realistic. I clearly remembered the wounded plesiosaurus on the beach over the intervening 34 years.

    • Rachel

      I was very good at spelling as a child and have found many words as an adult that are spelled differently from what I remember. There are common words that I misspell every single time I write them. This is the first time anyone has given me a plausible explanation, I also experienced deja vu quite often as a child and teen. I rarely do now.

    • Alan Wescoat

      Here is a thread I started on reddit in order to attempt to enumerate these particular spelling glitches.

      https://www.reddit.com/r/MandelaEffect/comments/3g8jgi/marshall_and_marshal_and_other_spelling_changes/

  • Braves Paul

    I was told when I was a small child in the late 80s, but the children’s librarian at the library my parents took me to, that the authors’ and therefore the bears’ names were pronounced Beren*stain*, as this article suggests. This is not weird at all. It’s the same thing as people rejecting the correct pronunciation of “GIF” as sounding like the peanut butter brand after reading the creator’s documentation because, OH GOD, we can’t change the wrongness that we’re used to.

    It’s not a parallel universe. It’s you’re own unwillingness to adapt to what is correct vs what you were raised to believe.

    • John E. Graham

      Graphics Interchange Format. Do you spell Graphics with a J?
      I know the age old argument. If I come up with an acronym, does mean get to pronounce it anyway I want. Here’s one: B.S.T.S. (Better safe, than sorry.) It’s pronounced [boo l-shit]

  • Alan Wescoat

    This is the most relevant episode of “The Twilight Zone” of which I am aware:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoSQdZwnNb0

  • Ben

    Another possibility is the way we associate things. Frankly, Berenstain is odd, it’s not a normal spelling. So, when kids see the name, they may already be familiar with many “stein” names, like Einstein, Frankenstein, Bernstein, etc.. Even with the correct spelling of Berenstain, people automatically convert it to Berenstein in their head because that seems more natural, more logical, because of the spelling conventions for names like that. I’m not sure about worldlines, or time travel; I just think our brains and our ways of word association are the culprit.

    • ChrisLoos

      ^ This is the correct answer.

    • Stephen Bourke

      But then aren’t they just killing an innocent person.
      I say let him get accepted to art school. Its all he wanted.

    • bub

      This is 100% the correct answer. Any psychologist is very familiar with this effect. No parallel realities, no mystery. It’s so simple it’s painful and sad that so many people fall for this crap.

    • johnny

      its fun lol

    • act_on_love

      Dear Benn and Buub,

      We’re just having a bit of fun. You are welcome to join in. Pull up a nice cold bear and stay a while 😀

    • act_on_love

      (on the other hand it appears that some of us are actually not kidding around, and if they can figure out how to go back in time and kill Hitler… Godspeed.)

    • Vivid Oblivion

      Hitler is already dead. What’s the problem?

    • act_on_love

      Sorry, didn’t finish the thought. Kill Hitler before he got anyone else killed.

    • Hector Augusto Garcia

      Hitler did nothing wrong.

    • Joeka33

      It depends who’s thinking about it. Are you personally saying Hitler didn’t do anything wrong or are you trying to convey what he (Hitler) thought.

    • sweetjazz3

      Whoa! I used to live in a parallel universe where people drank beer while reading the Berenstein Bears. But that was a much more ‘e’ heavy universe than the current ‘a’ heavy universe.

    • This is a much more rational explanation. People who so enjoy screaming, “PARALLEL UNIVERSES! ALIENS! CLOOONES!!!” can thank themselves for how little consideration and seriousness is given when actual strange phenomena occurs. Since we’re on the topic of children’s literature, you’d think that they’d have at least read or heard of “The Boy Who cried Wolf”.

    • Jc Equality Tilton

      Then why are there still Berenstein Bear books that can be found. It seems if they were well hidden away from our consciousness they are still spelled correctly, but the ones we could see and were aware of are changed…

    • Randy Miller

      This is true. Consider the following sentence. Your mind already understands what it says even though it is hardly accurate.

      Yaur mimd aleaddy undersrsands whut it says evan thareegh it is haerdly aceaeraeraate. You sieareeply need to have the first two and last two letters correct and your brain fills in the rest.

    • The Code

      Randy my friend, I get what you’re going for. But for the words to make sense they still need to have the same exact letters in them as in the original word. Same amount. No more, no less. And yes, the first and last words need to be the same as the original word.

  • Kasey Madlem

    I absolutely remember it being “ei”!! I remember trying to figure out how it was pronounced as a child. I just had to look at an old book after reading this article and, sure enough, AI. I have always believed that a separate dimension exists for each human, but we all somehow meld together in a sort of physical embodiment of the internet. I still don’t get why part of us remember one way, while the others remember the other. It’s very much like the fact that the history books are written one way, while word of mouth, passed down from our families differs greatly.

  • Taysand

    Dude. There’s an anime called Steins;Gate. Yes, STEINs;Gate. It’s literally all about this exact same concept of world lines and John titor and how some people aren’t affected by the memory shift. You should check it out if this stuff interests you!

    • Ryan Smithee

      Nice! My buddy just gave me a copy of that the other day. I haven’t watched it yet but now I will push it up my queue.

  • BreakingDeadMen

    What it suggests is that the brain is used to seeing the ‘stein ending and it just processes it that way. The same exact way that we can read a mispelled word and understand it. That’s how are brains work.

  • Jordan P

    My theory is that since there are 2 E’s preceding the “A” in question, the human mind threw another E at the end because that would make the most “sense” for our brains…i.e. someone with a last name ending in “-Stein” is likely more common that “-Stain.” It just sounds more “correct” in our mind that has been shaped by culture and norms.

    For evidence of this happening, check out those little brain teasers where they ask you if anything is wrong with a certain sentence. Typically, they’ll place a duplicate word such as “the” in the middle of the sentence. Read it over and over and you may struggle to figure out what they are talking about. When you’re given the answer that there are duplicate instances of the word “the” — bam — it suddenly appears twice and you wonder how you could’ve missed such a thing!

    No time travel or past-changing necessary.

  • Jessieza

    I was in B&N like July 6th and was looking at the books and all I could see was STAIN. Like it just jumped at me like I’M WRONG. I’M SPELLED WRONG. This was before I had any idea there was controversy. Confusing.

  • Macca

    Memory is one of the most fallible things. We have done so many studies and people are convinced, absolutely sure that they remember everything correctly when the studies have proven again and again that is NOT tha case. It has been proven that the brain fills in with whatever it feels like. Often times they compare memories as they are written down the day of the accident with months later to years later and the memories change so drastically, even with major events, as to make human memory as a concept laughable. Y’all can be 110% sure all you want but studies prove that human recall cannot be trusted. You are all, quite simply, remembering wrong. Yes, it is totally normal for this many people to be this sure of themselves and yet still be remembering wrongly. Nature simply desihned us this way.

  • Bub

    This is so dumb. The posited theorem is based off a kindergarden-level comprehension of quantum physics / metaphysics. If the timeline changed, then -stain would have always been the reality, any remembering otherwise would be simply misremembering. There would be no way to know if the timeline changed. Memory is the least reliable asset of humans; nothing any of use remember is entirely correct. It’s interpreted and changed over time by your brain; much of what all of us remember is fabricated. No matter how certain you are that it was -stein doesn’t make it so. Doesn’t mean it isn’t so; there simply isn’t any way of knowing

  • I wonder if those who are remembering it as Berenstein were exposed to them on television, and heard a pronunciation that confirmed that spelling. I only ever recall them in printed form Down Under, and as Berenstain. However, it’s not to discount that people have very clear, alternative memories (e.g. when Nelson Mandela died, some were adamant that they had heard that news long before that).

    • Alan Wescoat

      Not all of us. I could read and frequently saw Berenstein Bears books around my elementary school, which were read by other children. I was already long beyond that level of reading by second grade when I first noticed the books, so I never read them but saw the covers again and again. Sometime later in elementary school, a couple of the early Berenstein Bears specials (kind of like TV pilot episodes) were broadcast in my area (no cable). The announcer introducing between commercial breaks kept saying things like “Now back to ‘The Berenstein Bears'” where ‘-stein’ was pronounced with a ‘long i’ as though it were ‘stine’. In my local broadcast area, people would pronounce German words like ‘stein’ with the ‘long i’ sound instead of with a ‘long e’ sound, the same way that ‘Frankenstein’ usually gets pronounced by Americans and is lampooned in Mel Brook’s “Young Frankenstein”.

  • Briana Lyn Delaney

    The BEARS were Berenstain! The AUTHORS Jan and Stan were Berenstein! Both names were always on the front of the books, so it was easy to confuse!

    • Alan Wescoat

      Yeah. Your belief seems to indicate a third sort of middle-ground position, indicating that at least three slightly different realities merged. When I was polling friends regarding this, one said that it depends on how old the books are. She thought that the older books were “Berenstein Bears” and the newer books were “Berenstain Bears”.

    • Briana Lyn Delaney

      Ah I know. It was the font that made it look that way … Now I recall …

  • Katy

    You may be remembering the author’s name on the cover, which does include an E.

  • Alan Wescoat

    Here are two images of Berenstein Bears books which I am trying to post here for the second time:

    https://img.4plebs.org/boards/x/image/1407/22/1407224202060.jpg

    https://img.4plebs.org/boards/x/image/1409/01/1409016840055.jpg

    • bigbywolfe

      The “In the Dark” cover you posted is obviously altered. The spacing on the controversial E is different than the spacing on every other E in both words and an A could easily fit there.

      The other cover is much more convincing, but that can be chalked up to better editing.

    • Alan Wescoat

      Yeah. I have no idea about the authenticity. It is curious because it appears that ALL of the primary material is now “Berenstain”, while most of the secondary material has “Berenstein”, so even those of us who are in the “Berenstein”club (such as myself) do need to be suspect of ANY image of the primary material which maintains what we think it is supposed to. That being said, there is the sheer, raw cognitive dissonance when those of us in the “Berenstein” club sees the books with “Berenstain”, a cognitive dissonance I do not feel with these books, even if they are PhotosShopped.

    • Ro Elgas

      🙂 Wrinkle in time… I was reading the books to my son in the early to mid 80’s. Friends, both kids and moms I know from that time are very clear on the name being EI. Those who remember it as AI, same time, earlier or later?

  • Zraal

    The human memory has a really quirky design as it caters more towards ameliorating our daily tasks than actually remembering facts and events correctly. The faults in human memory are well researched and documented within the fields of psychology, cognitive science and even law. The fact that people are more prone to remembering the show as Berenstein rather than Berenstain is more likely to be the result of a lapse in memory than an alternate worldline.

    The lapse is most likely caused by the familiarization of the world ‘stein’ as it is a common to see stein in a jewish surname. In fact, “Bernstein” is an actual Jewish surname (I even thought the show was called “Bernstein Bears”). Not to mention the fact that Berenstein and Berenstain is a one letter difference!

    Assuming you watched the show at a young age you wouldn’t be too concerned about the etymologies of the names in the show. So from the start your Berenst#in memory would be weak. Over the years you would constantly be exposed to the names of jewish friends, celebrities, politicians with surname ending in stein. This would strengthen the idea that the show was called Berenstein. On the other hand the only connection Berenstain memory has to the real world is the show/books. Naturally, the overexposure of the jewish name “stein” and the underexposure to the show’s “stain” would lead eventually lead to the “stain” memory being pruned.

    This idea does not disprove alternate worldlines, but it provides a better explanation of the Berenst#in problem. I know, I want to believe too.

  • There’s plenty of odd examples of this… It might make a good SCP honestly.

    No-one says “mirror mirror on the wall” in sleeping beauty

    No-one says “bubble bubble toil and trouble” in macbeth

    Vader doesn’t say “luke, i am your father”

    “the butler did it” was never a cliche in the first place

    and in no star-wars movie is the word “Ewok” spoken

    • Rachel

      There are so many other examples like this!

  • Three_to_Five

    There’s a pretty easy explanation for this: Since most of us were either too young to read ourselves or just learning how to read, it’s likely that we don’t remember the exact spelling of the name. Given that “…stein” is far more common of a last name than “…stain,” we probably all just assumed the name was “Barenstein” even though it wasn’t.

    This is basically an example of Occam’s razor. Which is more likely: that we’re living in a parallel universe, or that we don’t remember the exact spelling of a proper name in a book that none of us have read in 30 years? I’m going with the spelling explanation.

  • Interesting article. If there are any sci fi fans,you guys should read The Quantum Thief by Rajaniemi. It deals with false realities and the manipulation of memories within the air of existence.

  • Bob Loblah

    SOOO CREEPY!! I remember to a T it was ‘stEIn… I think I had read every one of their books as a kid. That is soo weird!

  • Kizos

    Time works in a way in which the past is just as changeable as the future.

  • Groki

    A much wiser bear would have a much more appropriate answer. Oh, Bother…

  • Rob

    Wow talk about a logically fallacy. So, let me get this straight : If someone claims to be a time traveler and makes predictions that don’t come true, it’s not that he was lying about being a time traveler, its that he’s changed the course of history? Riiiiiight.

  • Rob

    This is also an example called “priming”. Eg, if you play some garbled audio to a person, they may not hear anything intelligible (like playing a record backwards.) But *tell* the person what the garbled audio is saying, suddenly they can “hear” it. Or show them a fuzzy blob on a picture and they won’t know what it is, but tell them it’s a ghost and suddenly they “see” a ghost. Your faulty memories from 30 years ago are faulty. Tell someone they *remember* it as “stein” and suddenly that’s how they think they remember it.

  • Lisa94

    I could have sworn it was Berenstein, but I’m open to the possibility that I’m mistaken. I have one of those surnames that people get wrong. It has an “ir”, and even when looking at it, a lot of people will write it down or pronounce it with an “ri” instead. It happens often enough that it’s a surprise when someone has it correct.

  • John Friedmann

    This is a very long, drawn out misguided theory based solely on dyslexia.

    • Dyslexia

      you might be right about the first part but infant/child grade reading comprehension =/= dyslexia

  • christopherjacques

    It was always Berenstein, because I was never sure to pronounce the name the Jewish way “steen” or the German way “stine”. Now we’re being told it’s neither?

    The simplest thing to do would just be to grab an old book and see what it says.

  • Richard

    Time travel 101: If the past is changed, so are the memories of the past. You cannot travel through time, change the past, and expect to see any evidence that such a change ever occurred. (Not to mention that one cannot travel through time to change the past at all, because it would alter their own origin conditions which led up to them traveling through time in the first place.) That being said, this phenomenon is quite strange. I also remember the bears as BerenstEin…but I think Ben’s response regarding psychological associations (and the underlying proven premise that our minds shape our reality) is a lot more plausible than time/alternate universe travel. When you hear hooves think horses, not zebras.

  • Rose Christenson

    Remember that meme that circles around so often with just the first and last letter of the word correct and the rest is jumbled? The brain bridges the gaps and fills in the information with what makes sense to it. As well as children, we depended on older people to read to us of course, and a lot of pronunciation we learned was based on what we heard phonetically. Add accents to the mix and it’s going to sound different in different regions! Another note: We do not remember events, we remember memories. Over time your brain is going to sluff out the unnecessary filler and just hold onto the important parts. Now the focus is on the last name. You are thinking back to when you were a kid. You can’t fully remember the difference until now it’s being pointed out. Now it’s a leading suggestion, making you second guess the information stored in your brain. No different from hearing different lyrics then what was actually written.

  • Jordon Flato

    I came across this today via a link to a different page, and then found my may here. This one has me chilled a bit. I would swear on just about anything that it was Stein. I was a careful reader, and have clear memories of wondering what the correct pronunciation was as a child. Stain would have presented no problem. And looking at it now feels….very off. Not right. Just weird.

    It seems like this is really gaining steam around the old ‘net. I think this is the new Is the Dress Yellow or Blue thing….

  • AZJackalope

    I remember it with the E. One of the reasons why is that I homeschooled my 2 kids. When I bought the books back in the late 80’s early 90’s one of my specific questions to the kids was how many e’s do you see in the bear’s last name. The number was 3. By the age of 4, both being 17 months apart,were reading grown up books, high school books etc.. I asked my daughter today what was the name of the books you kids read about the bears. She said Berenstein.

  • Cierra Carpenter

    It was Bernstein Bears growing up…I was so flabbergasted when flipping through channels one night and thinking it was a typo on my cable’s guide but I googled it and I couldn’t find ‘Bernstein’…this is too much think on so little sleep. Mind officially blown.

  • Charles

    I had this same thing. It used to be called MarshMELLOW, not MarshMALLOW

    • leannael

      Why are you still alive?

  • Robert Leatherman

    holy time rip

  • Rachel

    Funny it was only created three hours before you posted it. Not even sure what all those pictures are supposed to prove?

    • Lieu Tenant Dan

      Yes, I just went to google newspaper archive and then made a facebook page.

  • x-fan411

    I very clearly remember it as berenstein bears. that is odd….

  • Chris Parks

    does anyone else remember that other 90s show ‘win ben stain’s money?’ i tell ya something’s up

  • Robert K Buchberger

    another thing that couldve happened, was legal rights to the stein name and they were left with no choice but to change one letter the e to the a was probably the easiest course of action.

  • Dennis Rued

    I do remember, when I was about 7 or 8, looking at the title of the book, and realizing I was spelling it wrong(Berenstein) all of this time. But I must not have committed the spelling to memory, so therefore can’t recall it being spelled with an A. Go figure.

  • meaghan

    i bet it is because the word “berenstain” was in a sort of funny half-cursive font, and if you guys were anything like i was as a freshly-minted reader, then we all just quit part way through that long, oddly lettered word and filled it in as “berenstein” before getting to the good stuff.

  • Jeroenske

    Well that’s weird because ever since 2012 i had so many feelings of deja-vu it’s kind of amazing.

  • Robert McCarthy

    If time existed into the future, wouldn’t time travel just be a part of everyday life? If it was possible? Because if there was a future happening, people would be time traveling back here and selling trips to the future or bringing evidence of a future? If an unlimited amount of time was just existing, than the technology would be in existence to time travel sometime in the future, but since it’s impossible, there is not and will never be time travel.

  • Erin McMichael

    What is kind of upsetting is that the Berenstein authors might have felt the pressure to not have characters for children who sounded Jewish due to societal ostracism and racism–perhaps the publishers told them “Oh, a book called the Berenstein Bears will not sell to any good Christian households. How ’bout BerenstAin? That sounds cuter!”, thus the change to stAin . . . which, we obviously never even realized in the first place so their intention would have been moot (had that been their intention). Just my theory, lol.

  • Nat

    For those saying that most who remember it being ei are older, no I was born in 1988 and grew up watching the cartoon and reading the books at the school library and remember the new books at the book fair, I remember them as EI also because it was in a cursive format how the e connected to the I, and I was also confused because I was always taught that “I before e, except after c” which that rule didn’t apply to in this name so it confused me. I was in 5th grade in 1999 so how can I remember it being spelled ei after said time change??? Are maybe some people not affected to the mishaps of the time medlers. Can some people see the real truth while others are “blind” or see the new version of reality? Also I am a very empathetic person who always picks up on things that most don’t. I think some of us have gifts that allow us to see through the made up “truths” of this world. Just a lot of interesting stuff, I’ve really enjoyed reading these comments. This makes me wonder about the JFK shooting and if they tried to alter that but failed, that is why there is still no clear evidence as what happened because different people remember different things, and so on.

  • Nat

    So if there is only a handful of articles with the original EI spelling, what does that mean?? How could most books and things have been changed, but not some newspaper articles?

  • Vanessa Perez

    I want whatever you’re smoking.

  • Albert James StClair

    The dress is white and gold!

  • Sydney

    I know it was Berenstein because I had such a hard time spelling it and my mom couldn’t think of any way to remember the spelling. As someone who read these in 2007 and had “I’m a berenstein Bears fan” officially liscensed March, this freaks me out.

  • David Treadwell

    I enjoyed this article, it was an entertaining read. I was raised to believe that anything in the universe is a possibility and that’s always given me a pretty wild imagination. I am pretty skeptical now a days, but a huge part of me wants this to be true and it brings back memories of something that happened to me when I was very young. I am almost 30 now, but this happened when I was 8 or 9. I’ve always been pretty aware of my surroundings and not the type to zone out and get tunnel vision and lose my senses. One sunny day I was in the living room, sitting on our couch, watching cartoons like any other normal day. My father was in a separate room doing something I can’t quite recall, as was my mom in another separate room. During cartoon watching my mom came through the hall to my right, and walked in front of my view of the tv, and opened the sliding glass door and walked into our back yard and into our garage. Thinking nothing of it really, I continued to watch my show. Time went by and I started to wonder what she was doing out there for so long. My father eventually came into the living room and sat in his chair across from me. I still had been wondering about my mother being outside, but I figured she would be back in eventually. Well, she never came back in…after awhile of believing she was outside she came from around from the hallway corner! I was surprised and said “mom, when did you come back in?” As she walked in front of my tv view again “come in from where?” She said. “From the backyard.” I said to which she replied while now walking up our stairs “I never went outside, I’ve been in my craft room.” I looked at my dad and said “I thought mom went into the backyard awhile ago.” I can’t recall exactly what he said but it was along the lines of “I don’t know I was in the other room”. I never really argued with her what I thought I had experienced. I just let it go, kept it to myself until now, but I always had this strange feeling that reality was very slightly disturbed, like a glitch in time or that somehow I slipped into an alternate reality. I’m sure there is a logical explanation, but who knows…electrons can be in two places at once…maybe consciousness can slip in and out realities. I mean, who knows, humans are smart, but we are still very primitive and young in the grand scheme of things, trapped in our own self perspectives.

  • Vedran Noneofyourbusiness

    If the universe had really changed, our brains would have changed as well, and we wouldn’t be aware of the change. Also, did you hear about that thing down in Samothrace?

  • A. Nonny Mouse

    with all do respect, i doubt that a rift in the space time continuum would change a letter in a cartoon.

  • smallfry

    This discussion is very entertaining and for the record, I remember it as Berenstein Bears. Completely positive about the spelling. It’s amazing that so many others also remember it this way. This is not the only inconsistency that I have noticed, although like this they tend to be differences in details rather than larger discrepencies.

  • Laura

    Or maybe you’re not really intelligent but brainwashed.. Scared, even, to admit it was STeIN.. Don’t hide behind what’s safe and call it intellectually superior. Coward

    • guy

      I find I’m less disposed to vitriolic, bitter rants at complete strangers when I’m not hunched over the keyboard.

      You might want to look into a better office chair.

    • Toad

      You might want to notice that Laura was being tongue-in-cheek.

      And then we can all put these fingers down and stop wagging them at each other.

  • Unity Mistwalker

    could it just be, that we never actually HEARD the proper pronunciation, till the pbs cartoon, and we just said it wrong all those years?

  • Tomas Yevsin

    Why can I not find the live action Bernstein movie????

  • Grace

    My son, I, and my husband, back around 2003-2003, saw on T.V. news that Andy Griffith had died. We even commented that we’ll probably be seeing a bunch of Andy Griffith movies on T.V. now. (They always do that after someone dies….show their movies). A short time after that, he was very much alive and receiving an award! I thought, surely this award show must be a recording. I checked….nope, it was live that evening!

  • lexx b0t

    It was ALWAYS -stein. I swear. And I was one of those quiet introspective types that would spend lunch time contemplating book covers & finding Waldo & whatever by myself in a corner, than one to speed through reading something carelessly so I could goof off with friends instead. I can imagine having misread -IEN as -EIN all along, but never whatsoever if it had been -AIN. I must be from the universe where Biff never got hold of that book…

  • Dimensional Tourist

    I cannot recall name of bears, but do know there was a dimensional shift in 2005, I Used to be AB- blood but am now A-. So many differences for me including friends/family/past. I am only now coming to terms with this dimension,

  • L.a. Reynolds

    I used to work at a bookstore 20 years ago, and have to do book ordering. It was Berenstein. I know this, I had to type it often, shelf them, search for them – they were popular with parents. No idea if this is the right hypothesis but it is certainly weird. I know I didn’t remember it wrong

  • Louise

    I’m pretty sure my mum was talking about this in the 1990’s and asked how I remember it spelt, but I didn’t even know the books. My parents proceeded to have an argument about whether the spelling was correct or not. The common argument being is that as a child you would remember a word like ‘stain’ – what child would let that joke go… but I still think this is just a case of mis-remembering.

  • Steinbeck11

    Here’s one I haven’t seen before:
    Do you remember the famous tennis player: Chris Everette Lloyd?
    Well, now it’s Chris EVERT Lloyd.
    I watched tennis as a child, I remember the name and the spelling.
    Just another thing changed.

  • I remember it always being “Berenstain”…and everyone else I know recalls it being “Berenstein”…does this mean I’m a glitch in the Matrix? 😛

  • Allie

    WOW. I just dug out an old book my parents had packed away since childhood and there it was.. AIN. My head spun and I thought I was going to throw up for a sec. That is a mind f@ck!! I swear I could even visualize the EIN like most others. I fully support the science in the psychology of the phenomenon though. But… what if??

  • Mandy Candy

    Couldn’t his just be down to the difference in spelling between the authors names and the characters names? Also, haven’t they already determined this John Titor thing was a hoax?

  • Kath

    Well. That’s strange.

    At first I thought surely that’s just people mispronouncing “stein” as “steen” (and I think I may have had that argument with my brother too). But you’re saying it’s actually spelt with an A? Whut.

    I’m interested now to see what my friends and family remember.

  • Shine

    I’ve had some experienced recently…last few years…. that make it seem like we have shifted into a different version of this dimension. I’ve talked about it with other people, and have gotten confirmation of other weird experience and feelings.

  • amy

    **ask

  • Buffalo Trace

    I was at the store a few years ago and saw one of these bear books. I thought to my self, “that is spelled wrong.” When I saw it again I thought maybe the authors changed the spelling of their names. It was till recently I read about this theory. I asked my wife, “what is the name of the kids book about the family of bears?” She said BerenstEin. I asked her to spell it. Then asked are you sure it is no with an “A.” To which she said “of course not, I had all those books.” I have a hard time believing the “Mandela Effect.” I have never met anyone who thought he died in jail.

  • James F Deaton

    I wonder how many of the people that recall a childhood with them being called Berenstien also seem to remember the asteroid belt being between the earth and mars, not mars and jupiter…

  • Sabiondo

    Ended up here while trying to explain the phenomenon of how my wife and I met.

    Just the other day we were reminiscing on certain events, but when it comes down to one particular movie we went to see she remembers clearly one movie, while I another.

    Oh btw I clearly remembered it being spelled Berenstein.

  • Cindy

    I recall a totally different theme son. Perhaps we are discussing two completely different bear families.

    • pentium0077

      Bloody Hell!! This is the effect from time travel. Time travel must be forbidden in every possible timeline.

  • DocVance

    Hah, it’s fascinating to me reading all this as my only real “Glitch in the Matrix” moment had to do with the Berenstein Bears, too, though not just the spelling (I remember STEIN as well, for what it is worth).

    When I was a kid I had a box of Berenstein Bears fruit snacks I’d get at the market near my grandparents’ house, and I had the idea to freeze them to keep for later and to see if they were still edible way later (don’t ask me why I thought this was a good idea). I took them out of the packs and put them all in a Ziploc bag and buried them under everything else in my grandparents’ freezer, then forgot about them.

    One day a few years later I remembered them and got curious. Checked under all the ancient stuff still populating their freezer–the bag was still there, and though frozen solid, the gummies were still perfectly shaped… fish.

    The damn things were fish now. Cartoon fish, clearly defined, they weren’t just warped bears from frostbite or something. I was a preteen at this point and got this sudden rush of vertigo at the fact that something I knew so clearly was totally wrong. Glad other people get to have their Berenstein Bears existential crises now, heheheh.

  • NH Native

    John Tidor did it.

  • Andrei Cristian Prodan

    So what other similar evidence like the berenst#in problem is there? What other things seem now different than we remember them?

  • jim

    Yup.
    I have a ridiculous opinion that there was a famous event that can easily be seen as a very large quantum event.
    So many cats were alive and dead at the same time and for so many hours , that
    many new offshoot universes and timelines were spawned.
    In some way these can cross on the internet which after all is just electrons and ones and zeroes. So some of us are not in the same ‘verse.

  • I am from virtual reality

  • Demi Stefi

    Because einstein is a lot more popular word around than einstain or einsteen or whatever

  • Pepper Conchobhar

    Kk. So after the Bernenstain Bear thing, I did a bit of poking and found that I’m genuinely upset that I remember a bunch of crap that, apparently, never happened.
    – Curious George never had a tail
    – The witch in Snow White never says, “Mirror, mirror on the wall.”
    – That the Mr. Rodgers theme song didn’t say, “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood…”
    – That there is no portrait – ever – of Henry the 8th holding a big bird leg (In my modern mind, it’s a turkey leg, but they didn’t have turkeys in Europe back then)
    – That Nelson Mandela didn’t die in prison in the 80’s
    – That “Jif” peanut butter was never “Jiffy” peanut butter
    These are all things that I, and thousands of other people, remember clearly.
    There are other things that thousands of people ‘misremember’ and I’m not in that group.