New Discovery Casts Doubt On Mayan “Doomsday” Prophecy

Posted by on May 12, 2012 ⋰ 0 Comments

This week, archaeologists working at the Xultun ruins in Guatemala revealed their latest discovery: Ancient Mayan astronomical tables.

They were found in a surprisingly well-preserved “writing room,” where the ancient Mayans at Xultun likely worked on their astronomical calculations, setting the groundwork for their now infamous calendar system. Archaeologists even found something akin to a blackboard.

According to BBC News,

“The Xultun find is the first place that all of the cycles have been found tied mathematically together in one place, representing a calendar that stretches more than 7,000 years into the future.”

Unfortunately for all the Mayan doomsday prophets out there, this discovery actually “undermines” the so-called Mayan end times prophecies.

Archaeologist William Saturno suggests that, while many today are focusing on how the world will ultimately end, “The Maya were looking for a guarantee that nothing would change.” It’s a cultural difference, a contrasting “mindset,” he says.

Think that will put an end to the doomsayers, though? Of course not.

An article over at The Daily Mail suggests that we may be doomed after all, thanks to a broken 1,000 year old “volcanic rock skull” previously owned by, who else, Heinrich Himmler.

It had been picked up by the Nazis during their trip to Tibet in the late 1930s, where they searched for Shangri-La or, as some theories have it, the entrance to the Hollow Earth.

“According to legend, the Mayan skull, which was stolen from Tibet by the Nazis and imbued for believers with magical powers to enable mankind to survive an apocalypse, fell and chipped during a photo shoot.”

The skull was chipped this week, allegedly removing its specially imbued powers and once again opening the windows and letting all the apocalypse in.

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Post by Rob Schwarz

Rob Schwarz is a writer, blogger, and part-time peddler of mysterious tales. He manages Stranger Dimensions in between changing aquarium filters and reading bad novels about mermaids.

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