Can Ouija Boards Unlock The Mysteries Of Our Unconscious Minds?

Posted by on March 19, 2012

Ouija boards are occult tools used by many to communicate with the deceased. In fact, some warn they can have unintended consequences, opening portals for demons and other negative entities and allowing them to pass into our world.

But new research indicates they may have a more practical use.

An experiment at the University of British Columbia has revealed that there exists a “nonconscious intelligence” within each of us, and that “ideomotor actions are unconsciously-initiated, thoughts-expressing movements.”

How did they discover this? By using Ouija boards.

From the abstract:

“Ideomotor actions are behaviours that are unconsciously initiated and express a thought rather than a response to a sensory stimulus. The question examined here is whether ideomotor actions can also express nonconscious knowledge.

We investigated this via the use of implicit long-term semantic memory, which is not available to conscious recall. We compared accuracy of answers to yes/no questions using both volitional report and ideomotor response (Ouija board response).”

The experiment found that, when the participants didn’t know the answer and thought they were guessing, the ideomotor, Ouija-driven responses had a “significantly higher” accuracy than the volitional (or deliberate) guesses.

The results of this study are no doubt intriguing, and it makes me wonder if most conversations with “spirits” through Ouija boards may actually be conversations with our own, unconscious minds.

The research paper is called “Consciousness and Cognition,” and you can view the full abstract here.

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About the Author Post by Rob Schwarz

Rob Schwarz is a writer, blogger, and part-time peddler of mysterious tales. He manages Stranger Dimensions in between changing aquarium filters and reading bad novels about mermaids.