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Robot Defeats Humanity at Rock Paper Scissors Every Time

By on December 6, 2013 at 3:15 am - 1 Comment

We’ve seen robots that can do a lot of things. Chop noodles. Fly like birds. Stalk old people in nursing homes. Now we can add beat humans 100% of the time at Rock Paper Scissors to that growing list of reasons we should worry.

Oh, sure. We’ve made robots that can play games before. Some have even beaten chess grandmasters. But this is something else – Rock Paper Scissors is a game of chance, right? How can a robot win 100% of the time at a game of chance?

Developed by the Ishikawa Oku Lab at the University of Tokyo, this robot can do exactly that. It never loses a match of Rock Paper Scissors (or Janken, the Japanese equivalent), no matter how many Rocky-like training montages you might put yourself through to become the best. You’ll lose, it will win. Every time.

robot-games

It’s not really chance, though, is it? The robot is able to perceive human hand motions at such a high speed that it can determine what the human is going to choose before the human can even process the thought of blinking. It looks instantaneous to us, but it’s actually the result of high-speed cameras and processors, and a really fast and articulate robot hand that can calculate in a single millisecond, and react quicker than you can perceive.

“Recognition of human hand can be performed at 1ms with a high-speed vision, and the position and the shape of the human hand are recognized. The wrist joint angle of the robot hand is controlled based on the position of the human hand. The vision recognizes one of rock, paper and scissors based on the shape of the human hand. After that, the robot hand plays one of rock, paper and scissors so as to beat the human being in 1ms.”

Think about that, then get back to work on your time machine so we can stop Skynet before it starts…or is it already too late?

About the Author

Rob Schwarz is a freelance writer, blogger, and part-time peddler of mysterious tales. Follow him on Twitter @Dimentoid or on Google+, and be sure to like Stranger Dimensions on Facebook!
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  • RetsuUnohana

    so basically read your hand pattern (hand muscles to know which way your forming hand movements).. really that would be the only way. Imagine a robot that could see when your reaching to your guns, direction etc. The ultimate guard